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INTERELIGIOUS LEARNING

School

Hartford International

ET-665

The Daily Round and Life Cycle Events in Jewish and Muslim Law

BTI Category

Semester

Interreligious Learning

FA24

Jewish and Islamic Law are remarkably similar in scope, content, and theological underpinnings. This course enables students to explore the similarities and differences through a side-by-side presentation of frequently-encountered issues in both systems. After a brief introduction to the sources, history, and schools of Jewish and Islamic law, the course turns to focus on the regulations concerning: Purity, Prayer, Birth and Death Rituals, Charity, Fasting, Food, Dress, Marriage and Divorce. The course equips students with the practical knowledge of these topics, including how the classical regulations are implemented in the modern world.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Laher

M

5-7pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Hartford International

HI-539

Interrogating Abraham: Examining Intersections between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

BTI Category

Semester

Interreligious Learning

FA24

Judaism, Christianity, and Islam have often been called the Abrahamic Religions, as they all claim the Patriarch Abraham‎. To what extent do these three faiths identify with him, define him, and share him? This course will use an interdisciplinary approach to problematize the Abrahamic identities of early Jewish, Christian, and Muslim communities, their views of the Patriarch, and how such identities have guided and affected past and contemporary inter-communal relations. Attention will be given to how sacred scripture, contemporary literature and film shapes and provide meaning for relations today.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Grafton

T

5-7pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Hartford International

AM-667

Faith and Leadership in Times of Crisis

BTI Category

Semester

Interreligious Learning

FA24

The havoc wrought by the global onslaught of the novel coronavirus has been complexified during the ensuing years by domestic mass-casualty incidents (both naturally-occurring and human-orchestrated); by climate trauma; by warfare, asylum-seeking, and immigration; and by fierce attitudinal clashes (often exacerbated by bigotry and blaming) with regard to systemic racism, the nature and content of public education, access to certain medical procedures, and much more. As emergent occasions have melded, one into the next, the need for robust resources and strategies for sensitive leadership, deep understanding, and efficacious interreligious collaboration has become all the more apparent. This course seeks to address that need.Through engagement with case studies, anecdotal accounts, scripture, devotional literature, theological discourse, interreligious scholarship, and lived experience, this course facilitates investigation of the nature of leadership, followership, and entrepreneurship. Working asynchronously yet collegially, students in this course undertake multireligious consideration of questions such as: To what strategic and spiritual resources might we turn in times of great stress. What are we to do when access to those resources is disrupted? How can any of us provide comfort, hope, and cautious wisdom with integrity (and what actions can we take) when anxiety, grief, fear, or divisive forces threaten to overwhelm or isolate? What sorts of collaborative efforts have proven effective?

Professor

Class Day & Time

Mosher

ASYNC

Asynchronous

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology

INDS 7130 H1

Anglicans and Orthodox in Dialogue

BTI Category

Semester

Interreligious Learning

FA24

The course will examine the theological conversations between Anglicans and Orthodox, especially through the official bilateral dialogue that was established 50 years ago as well as in the work of the International Commission for Anglican-Orthodox Dialogue (ICAOTD) and the Agreed Statements produced by the Commission. This has been one of the most important dialogues of the Orthodox Church marked by contributions of distinguished contemporary Orthodox theologians, among them, Metropolitan John Zizioulas and Metropolitan Kallistos Ware. Part of the course will coincide with the next meeting of the ICAOTD which will take place in October for the first time on the campus of Hellenic College-Holy Cross School of Theology sponsored by the Huffington Ecumenical Institute at HCHC. This will offer a unique opportunity for students to be exposed to firsthand experience of this bilateral ecumenical dialogue.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Rev. Dr. Christos Christakis

TBA

TBA

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

TBA

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO7507-01

Theology of Religions / Comparative Theology

BTI Category

Semester

Interreligious Learning

FA24

This seminar will focus on the various theological positions which have been developed with regard to the reality of religious pluralism as well as on the relationship between theology of religions and comparative theology. While we will focus mainly on the works of Christian theologians, we will also pay attention to analogous developments in other religious traditions.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Cornille

T

10a-12:25p

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2360

Alternative Spiritualities in the United States

BTI Category

Semester

Interreligious Learning

FA24

This course surveys spiritual practices and movements that have been labeled as metaphysical, esoteric, pagan, occult, harmonial, and New Age. We will begin with a historical survey of esoteric spirituality from colonial-era astrology and alchemy to New Age and neopagan traditions, then consider some leading constructive thinkers within alternative spiritual traditions, such as Starhawk and Joanna Macy. The course will also feature field trips to a variety of spiritual organizations and communities. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 1562.

Professor

Class Day & Time

McKanan

T

03:00pm-05:30pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Hartford International

ET-665-2

The Daily Round and Life Cycle Events in Jewish and Muslim Law

BTI Category

Semester

Interreligious Learning

FA24

Jewish and Islamic Law are remarkably similar in scope, content, and theological underpinnings. This course enables students to explore the similarities and differences through a side-by-side presentation of frequently-encountered issues in both systems. After a brief introduction to the sources, history, and schools of Jewish and Islamic law, the course turns to focus on the regulations concerning: Purity, Prayer, Birth and Death Rituals, Charity, Fasting, Food, Dress, Marriage and Divorce. The course equips students with the practical knowledge of these topics, including how the classical regulations are implemented in the modern world.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Laher

M

5-7pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Hartford International

HI-539-2

Interrogating Abraham: Examining Intersections between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

BTI Category

Semester

Interreligious Learning

FA24

Judaism, Christianity, and Islam have often been called the Abrahamic Religions, as they all claim the Patriarch Abraham‎. To what extent do these three faiths identify with him, define him, and share him? This course will use an interdisciplinary approach to problematize the Abrahamic identities of early Jewish, Christian, and Muslim communities, their views of the Patriarch, and how such identities have guided and affected past and contemporary inter-communal relations. Attention will be given to how sacred scripture, contemporary literature and film shapes and provide meaning for relations today.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Grafton

T

5-7pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology

PAST 7360

World Religions

BTI Category

Semester

Interreligious Learning

FA24

We will look at humanity's quest for God from the beginning of time, and how four of the world's major religious traditionsÑJudaism, Islam, Hinduism, and BuddhismÑdeveloped. Along with their history, we will study their main teachings, worldview, and practice. Part of the class will include visiting temples of the other faiths. We will also look at the phenomenon of atheism and its own religious perspective. With each of these different religions, we willdiscussOrthodox Christianity's understanding of other religions and how we are to dialogue and interact with them, trying to discover elements that could be acceptable within Orthodox Christianity, and how these bridges could be used in sharing our faith within other religions. This Course fulfills the World Religions/Ecumenism requirement.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Rev. Luke A. Veronis

T

6:40-9 PM

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology

INDS 7110 H1

The Ecumenical Movement: Challenges and Opportunities

BTI Category

Semester

Interreligious Learning

FA24

The Ecumenical Movement that started in the second half of the 19th century does not constitute an ideology but rather reflects the authentic commitment to reconcile divided Christians in the unity of the Church and the reality of communion. Throughout the past century, the quest for Christian unity has assumed many shapes and forms that may be studied through major documents produced along the history of the 20th century and beyond. This course will define the boundaries of Ecumenism and its challenges for contemporary Orthodoxy by looking inward as well as outward as faithful and thoughtful Christians.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Rev. Dr. Philip Joseph Halikias

T

9:40 AM - 12 PM

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston University School of Theology

STHTA 815

World Religions in Boston

BTI Category

Semester

Interreligious Learning

FA24

In an increasingly pluralistic society it is essential to have some understanding of the beliefs and worship patterns of other religions and to be able to engage in dialogue with them. This course utilizes the Pluralism Project at Harvard to explore new forms of interfaith engagement. Seven weekly lectures introduce the issues surrounding interfaith work and a basic understanding of the tenets and practices of five major religions. Site visits (to Hindu, Muslim, Sikh, Buddhist and Jewish worship services) offer first- hand experiences and the opportunity for discussion and interaction with religious leaders and lay people.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Andrew Shenton

A-Term course: August 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27 (not Sunday 25)

2:00-9:00pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3751

Who Needs God? Rethinking God in Light of Hindu and Christian Theologies

BTI Category

Semester

Interreligious Learning

FA24

This course reflects on God reconsidered in light of modern and postmodern doubts about the very idea of �God,� in cultures where belief in God, and even understanding of God, is waning. What does needing God mean, for whom? The questions are raised in light of Hindu and Christian scriptures, from philosophical and theological perspectives, and with reference to spiritual paths to union with God in these great traditions. What is missing, if God is missing? Readings include: selected scriptural texts; St. Bonaventure�s Christian Journey of the Mind to God, Sri Sankara's great Goddess hymn, Ocean of Beauty; the 19th century mystics Ramakrishna and T�r�se of Lisieux; 20th century prophets of compassion and justice, Mohandas K. Gandhi and Dorothy Day. Comparing Hindu and Christian traditions on God challenge 21st century ideas of God, religion, self, but the course strongly welcomes insights from other traditions ancient and modern. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Science as Religion 1059. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Science as Religion 1059.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Clooney

MW

10:30am-11:45am

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

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