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Harvard Divinity School

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 4460

Elementary Spanish for Reading

BTI Category

Semester

Languages

FA24

This course introduces students to Spanish grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and translation with the goal of developing students’ vocabulary and reading comprehension skills. Students will read and translate selections related to theological and religious studies from across time periods, traditions, and genres. In addition to the course readings, students will have the opportunity to work with and translate a text of their choice from their own research discipline.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Neufeld

R

05:00pm-07:59pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

Limited enrollment course. Enrollment priority given to HDS students and other Harvard faculty cross-registrants.

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 1102

Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament 1: Pentateuch and Former Prophets

BTI Category

Semester

Languages

FA24

A critical introduction to the literature and theology of the Hebrew Bible, considered in light of the historical contexts of its formation and the interpretive contexts of its reception within Judaism and Christianity. The course, the first part of a divisible, year-long sequence, will focus on the major biblical narrative traditions, the Pentateuch and Former Prophets. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as ANE 120a.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Teeter

TR

10:30am-11:45am

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 1417

Genesis: Narrative Artistry and Theological Meanings

BTI Category

Semester

Languages

FA24

A close critical reading in English of the Book of Genesis with an eye both to the storytellers' techniques and to the theological dimension of the text. Primary emphasis will be given to literary and religious rather than historical and editorial issues. No prerequisites, though an introductory course in critical biblical studies would be useful. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 1134.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Levenson

TR

10:30am-11:45am

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 1557

Greek Exegesis of Luke

BTI Category

Semester

Languages

FA24

The course will be devoted to a close reading and interpretation of the Gospel of Luke. The Greek text will be discussed with specific attention paid to literary structures, textual critical issues, historical context, and history of interpretation.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Bazzana

W

03:00pm-05:00pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

At least two semesters of Greek are required; the course might fulfill the requirement for a fourth semester of Greek. This course provides the opportunity to write a research paper. This course has limited enrollment. Please, email the instructor (at gbazzana@hds.harvard.edu) with a short introduction and a paragraph explaining the reasons to enroll in the course. Students will be notified before the enrollment deadline.

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 1646

Jewish Religion and Politics in the 20th Century: Europe, America, and Israel

BTI Category

Semester

Judaic Studies

FA24

The history of Jewish politics and religion is a complex story. Since Jews lived most of their collective lives outside the normative politically sphere (empire, monarchy, nation-state etc.) there is a question whether Jews had a political tradition at all before modernity. The multi-volume The Jewish Political Tradition argues that indeed Jews thought deeply about politics and developed a variety of political traditions even though they were void of much political power. This course will begin with Political-Theological Treatise of the 17th century philosopher Benedict (Baruch) Spinoza and his notion of Judaism as a political religion, and then turn to Karl Marx�s famous essay �On the Jewish Question.� These seminal texts will be our frame to look at how later movements continued to engage the ideas raised in both Spinoza and Marx.We will then pick up the story a bit later � in the 20th century - when Jews became embedded in the political traditions in the U.S. and began to develop a political tradition of sovereignty in a Jewish national movement known as Zionism. Religion remained part of this political story in both overt and covert ways. This course will focus on political and religious radicalism, the figures and movements that offered radical political alternatives, both left and right, progressive and reactionary, ideological and social. The movements will cover the span of the 20th century from labor unions and Jewish communism and socialism in early 20th century America, to the Hebrew Canaanites, the new Religious Post-Zionists in the 21st century and the feminist and Queer revolutions in Judaism.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Magid, Shaul

T

01:00pm-02:59pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 1802

The Joseph Story and the Book of Esther: Seminar

BTI Category

Semester

Languages

FA24

A close critical reading of Genesis 37-50 and the Book of Esther in Hebrew. Emphasis on the literary design and religious message of each work and on the influence of the story of Joseph upon the Book of Esther. Includes a research-based paper. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Hebrew 218.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Levenson

R

03:00pm-04:59pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

Prerequisite: Three years of Hebrew or the equivalent (with a good command of biblical grammar) and a solid acquaintance with the historical-critical study of the Hebrew Bible.

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2082

Spiritual Paths to Abstract Art

BTI Category

Semester

Sociology/Ethnography/Research Methods

FA24

Approaching 20th-century abstract art through the lens of religious studies, this course explores alternatives to twentieth-century narratives of modern art centered on the existential crisis of a heroic-- usually male, Caucasian and secular—individual.  In contrast, we will center paths to abstraction in which a departure from or repurposing of the figure emanates from spiritual sources not usually associated with modernity.  Locating the artists’ work within their biographies and their communities, the course focuses on abstraction as a vehicle for delving intersections of spirituality with history, race, ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality.  Religious movements and experiences that led to abstraction, rather than the artistic styles that resulted, serve as the organizing principle for the syllabus.  We will attend to the outsize interest of abstract artists in Theosophy, as well as to paths to abstraction originating outside of Europe, and/or grounded in Indigeneity, Judaism, Christian Science, and the Occult. Artists treated include Hilma af Klint, Wassily Kandinsky, Mary Sully, Hyman Bloom and Betye Saar, among others. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 1571.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Braude

R

12:00pm-01:59pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2170

Introduction to Christian Preaching

BTI Category

Semester

Preaching, Liturgy, & Ritual

FA24

This course introduces students to the theology and the practice of preaching within the Christian liturgical tradition, though students of any religious tradition or training - and of none - are welcome. Special attention will be paid to developing a theological, rhetorical, and homiletical understanding of both the preacher and the preached word, and students will be expected to prepare and deliver several sermons during the course of the term.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Potts

R

12:00pm-02:45pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

This is a limited enrollment course. Interested students should email the instructor by April 10, 2024. The email should briefly state the student's reasons for their interest in the course, their academic program, and their anticipated graduation date. Notifications of placement will be shared by Monday, April 15.

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2321

Writing about Revelation: Scholarly Approaches to Religious Experience

BTI Category

Semester

Sociology/Ethnography/Research Methods

FA24

When someone says they have spoken with God, what is a scholar to do? This course considers a range of scholarly approaches to such claims, from the sympathetic to the skeptically reductive. Focusing primarily on American religious history--and covering a diverse array of figures and time periods, including Anne Hutchinson, Handsome Lake, Nat Turner, Ellen White and Sojourner Truth--the course will give students a chance to grapple with the words of these remarkable figures and analyze the ways that scholars have sought to make sense of them. The first half of the course will review the secondary literature and critically engage the theories and methods that have been brought to bear on these accounts; the second half of the course will give students a chance to develop their own informed approaches as they write about revelation. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 2563.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Holland

R

12:00pm-02:00pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2360

Alternative Spiritualities in the United States

BTI Category

Semester

Interreligious Learning

FA24

This course surveys spiritual practices and movements that have been labeled as metaphysical, esoteric, pagan, occult, harmonial, and New Age. We will begin with a historical survey of esoteric spirituality from colonial-era astrology and alchemy to New Age and neopagan traditions, then consider some leading constructive thinkers within alternative spiritual traditions, such as Starhawk and Joanna Macy. The course will also feature field trips to a variety of spiritual organizations and communities. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 1562.

Professor

Class Day & Time

McKanan

T

03:00pm-05:30pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2390A

Colloquium in American Religious History

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

FA24

Presentation and discussion of the research of doctoral candidates in American religious history. Available, with instructors permission, to Harvard doctoral students in other fields of religious studies or American studies. Note: First half of an academic year bi-weekly course. Credit will not be earned unless both the fall and spring semester of the course is completed. Course may be taken on a Sat/unsat basis only. This course is limited to doctoral students with interests in North American religions. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 3505A.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Brekus

T

06:00pm-07:59pm

Grading Option

P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

DOCTORAL ONLY

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2610

Contemplative Prayer in Christianity

BTI Category

Semester

Preaching, Liturgy, & Ritual

FA24

This seminar will explore contemplative prayer in Christianity through the slow and focused reading and rereading of six primary texts: Evagrius Ponticus's Chapters on Prayer; The Cloud of Unknowing; Teresa of Avila's Interior Castle; Simone Weil's Witing for God; Howard Thurman's Disciplines of the Spirit; and Thomas Merton's New Seeds of Contemplation. Special attention will be given to the forms these writers develop in which to write about contemplative prayer, the practices they commend, and the ways in which these six texts respond to each other's questions.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Paulsell

T

09:00am-11:00am

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2965

Virginia Woolf and Religion

BTI Category

Semester

Sociology/Ethnography/Research Methods

FA24

This course will examine some of the religious currents around Woolf--in her family, her society, her friendships and her reading--and explore their relationship to her work. Special attention will be given to Woolf as a religious thinker, the religious-literary practices that shaped her life and work, her experiments with the idea of God, her reimagining of the possibility of religious community, the spiritual trajectories of the modernist movement she helped to shape, and the religious dimensions of her attempt to reimagine literary realism.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Paulsell

M

03:00pm-05:45pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3019

Buddhist Chaplaincy: Spiritual Foundations in Caregiving Practice

BTI Category

Semester

Buddhist Studies

FA24

Buddhism is a tradition rich in many resources relating to the care of others. For the Buddhist chaplain in healthcare settings and social engagement, these include philosophical, narrative and practice-oriented approaches that support not only one’s caregiving competencies but the foundations of one’s own dharma practice. This course will emphasize key principles, scriptural narratives and practices within Buddhism applied to clinical chaplaincy and social interventions to inform our understanding of five key areas: 1) How can we see Buddhism to be a fundamental tradition of caring for others? 2) How do we understand "faith" from a Buddhist perspective? 3) How can contemplative practices support oneself and others in clinical and socially engaged settings? 4) What are the opportunities, obstacles, and skillful means Buddhists need to work as a chaplain? and 5) How might integrating Buddhist principles of caregiving foster a deeper dharma practice? Objectives for this course are to provide a strong foundation for Buddhist ministry in the area of clinical chaplaincy that benefits both caregiver and careseeker from within Buddhist texts and traditions. The aim is to integrate one�s understanding of Buddhist teachings into praxis in a skillful, applied way.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Berlin

R

03:00pm-05:29pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

Prerequisite: A fundamental knowledge of basic Buddhism is required.

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3065

The Man of Light: The Philosophy and Spirituality of Henry Corbin

BTI Category

Semester

Sociology/Ethnography/Research Methods

FA24

This seminar will focus on the writings of Henry Corbin (1903-1978), the philosopher of religion and scholar of Islam, especially the Persian tradition. The aim of the seminar will be to read Corbin�s major works; to understand his controversial place in the history of the study of religion in general, and of Islam in particular; to appreciate him as a creative and constructive philosopher and theologian in his own right; and to assess his legacy for the 21st century. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 1521.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Stang, Charles

T

03:00pm-04:59pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3142

Coming of Age: American Religious History through the Novel

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

FA24

This course surveys American religious history, using a series of coming-of-age novels as its primary sources. It begins with Catharine Sedgewick's Unitarian take on Puritanism in Hope Leslie, and moves through Harriet Wilson's tale of an indentured Black girlhood in Our N--, Harold Frederic's narrative of a Methodist fall from grace in The Damnation of Theron Ware, James Baldwin's Pentecostal wrestle in Go Tell It on the Mountain, Rudolfo Anaya's borderland intertwining of Indigenous spirituality and Catholicism in Bless Me, Ultima, Chaim Potok's classic exploration of Jewish identity in The Chosen, and Ayad Akhtar's portrait of a midwestern Muslim boyhood in American Dervish. Students will situate these novels as artifacts of their time and place, consider their capacity to illustrate both historical phenomena and authorial perspective, and critically engage their artistic expression of religious experience. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 2468.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Holland

T

09:00am-010:59am

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3166

Ecotheology

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

This course will survey constructive religious reflection that is informed by an ecological worldview and accountable to various forms of environmental activism. Readings will be drawn from a variety of religious and spiritual traditions, among them Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Paganism, religious naturalism, and Indigenous spirituality. We will pay special attention to the interplay between ecotheology and various theologies of liberation. Students will be invited to develop their own constructive theological or atheological proposals in dialogue with the assigned readings. Throughout the semester, we will use optional book groups to explore additional ecotheological texts. All students are expected to complete one or more group projects and to provide oral and written feedback on one another’s work. Students will have the option of completing a major research paper. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 1577.

Professor

Class Day & Time

McKanan

T

12:00pm-02:30pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3184

Mind, Spirituality, and Mental Health in Hinduism I

BTI Category

Semester

Hinduism Studies

FA24

This two semester course will interrogate the various ways in which discussions on Hinduism have been included or have illuminated issues in the contemporary psychological sciences. We will read how different intellectual approaches ranging from psychoanalysis, folk psychology, cognitive anthropology, global mental health, and psychedelic sciences engage the archives of Hinduism as well as how ideas and practices from Hinduism are employed to provide an alternative to the therapeutic and treatment registers found in these approaches. The first part of the course in the Fall semester will emphasize the more philosophical, theological and moral psychological framework on these issues.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Bagaria

T

12:00pm-01:59pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3338

The Prophet Muhammad in History, Devotion, and Polemic

BTI Category

Semester

Islamic Studies

FA24

In the early seventh century, a man named Mu_ammad son of _Abdallah founded a movement that in time grew into a global religion, empire, and civilization. This course explores three discourses that developed around the life and character of the Prophet Muhammad. First, we will survey some of the biographies that Muslim scholars, both ancient and modern, have written about the life of their prophet. Second, we will explore how the Prophet's life, teachings and persona have served as subjects of Islamic devotion. Finally, the course examines some of the ways in which non-Muslims, again both ancient and modern, have perceived and portrayed Muhammad in polemic against Islam or dialogue with Muslims. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 1078.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Goudarzi

T

01:00pm-02:59pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3391

Introduction to Hindu Spiritual Care

BTI Category

Semester

Hinduism Studies

FA24

Team-taught by Swami Tyagananda, Director, Ramakrishna Vedanta Society in Boston, Harvard�s Hindu Chaplain, and a noted teacher and author, and HDS's Francis X. Clooney who, as a Christian, has studied Hinduism for fifty years. This course explores starting points, attitudes, and specific forms of spiritual care distinctive to Hindu traditions, in light of general qualities and norms expected for ministry and spiritual care today in any tradition. Attention paid first to starting points in Hindu scripture and practice, wand to classic texts such as the Bhagavad Gita and the Ramayana. Subsequent classes focus on cases: e.g., hospital chaplaincy and care for the dying; campus ministry; counseling of individuals facing life issues; guidance for couples preparing to marry and planning a family; responses to the suffering, death, and disruption caused by natural and social evils. Visiting lecturers, experienced in Hindu spiritual care, enrich the course throughout. Students of all backgrounds welcome, including those planning to practice spiritual care in other traditions, and those interested in multifaith spiritual care. Weekly written reflections required, and a theoretical or practical project/essay required, started midcourse and turned in at the end.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Clooney

T

12:00pm-01:59pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3953

Nirvana: Recent Interpretations

BTI Category

Semester

Buddhist Studies

FA24

While Nirvana is a critical and central part of Buddhist thought and practice, Buddhist practitioners as well as Buddhist scholars and academic students of Buddhism have found it difficult to grasp and understand. This course will focus on some recent explorations of Nirvana, including those by Venerable Analayo, Phra Payudh Payutto, Venerable Katukurunde Nanananda, and Steven Collins.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Hallisey

T

03:00pm-04:59pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 4008

Advanced Literary Tibetan II: Narrative Strategies

BTI Category

Semester

Buddhist Studies

FA24

This course will read selections from Tibetan masterpieces of literary narrative, including autobiography, historiography, and prophetic dream narrative. We will also read several selections from modern Tibetan novels and short stories. A co-instructor with expertise in Tibetan literature and native reading capacity will lead the readings. Students should have at least an intermediate level of reading competency to take the class.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Gyatso

F

01:00pm-02:59pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

Intermediate reading ability in classical Tibetan.

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 4054

Intermediate Pali I

BTI Category

Semester

Languages

FA24

This course is the third part of a two-year program designed to allow the student to read Buddhist canonical materials in Pali independently. The readings are taken from the canonical collections and are chosen and arranged thematically, exposing the student to key aspects of the teachings of Theravada Buddhism. The course readings are chosen to enrich the student's understanding of these teachings, at the same time as strengthening language skills.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Chrystall

MWF

10:30am-11:30am

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

Prerequisites: Elementary Pali II or equivalent (with permission of the instructor). Note: Auditors not allowed. Limited enrollment course. Enrollment priority given to HDS students and other Harvard faculty cross-registrants.

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 4211

Elementary Greek I

BTI Category

Semester

Languages

FA24

Introduction to ancient Greek emphasizing the grammar and vocabulary of the New Testament. Course has additional section hour to be arranged.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Skedros

MWF

09:00am-09:59am

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

Enrollment priority given to HDS students and other Harvard faculty cross-registrants. Permission to enroll in the course will be granted as petitions are received.

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 4412

German for Reading

BTI Category

Semester

Languages

FA24

An introduction to German grammar, syntax, vocabulary and translation with reading selections at an elementary level related to theological and religious studies. No prior knowledge of German is expected or required. Limited enrollment course. Enrollment priority given to HDS students and other Harvard faculty cross-registrants.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Grundler-Whitacre

W

05:00pm-07:59pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 4451

Elementary French for Reading

BTI Category

Semester

Languages

FA24

An introduction to French grammar, syntax, vocabulary and translation, with reading selections at an elementary level related to theological and religious studies.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Torracinta

W

05:00pm-06:59pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

Limited enrollment course. Enrollment priority given to HDS students and other Harvard faculty cross-registrants.

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 4464

Advanced Intermediate Spanish Readings

BTI Category

Semester

Languages

FA24

This course focuses on Spanish reading comprehension and translation at the intermediate/advanced level with special attention to preparation for the HDS Spanish language exam.  Students will translate Spanish-language texts from various time periods, regions, traditions, and genres into English and will learn to recognize key grammatical structures, vocabulary, and linguistic nuances with the goal of comprehension of written material in Spanish.  At the end of the course, students will have the opportunity to work with and translate a text of their choice from their own research disciplines.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Eldrett

MW

06:15pm-07:45pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

Prerequisites: HDS 4463 or the equivalent. Limited enrollment course. Enrollment priority given to HDS students and other Harvard faculty cross-registrants.

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 1202

Introduction to the New Testament

BTI Category

Semester

Scripture & Biblical Studies

FA24

This course will provide a basic historical introduction to critical issues in the study of the New Testament.�What are the contents of these texts that make up the second portion of the Christian Bible?�In what ways do they reflect the major issues, concerns, and struggles that were taking place among the earliest Christ-followers?�How did they get to be grouped together in a single book called the "New Testament"?�In addition to these historical questions, we will also attend to the New Testament's ongoing role as Christian scripture to consider the following: what does it mean to study a religious text critically? How might the study of the New Testament's social and historical context relate to its ongoing role as sacred and/or authoritative in the Christian tradition?�And what are some of the diverse ways that contemporary readers bridge the gap between the New Testament's ancient Greco-Roman context and their own interpretation and application?�We will explore these questions through careful study of the New Testament texts themselves, while also attending to issues of historical context, methodology, and hermeneutics.�No previous study in religion or ancient history is assumed, and there are no prerequisites for enrolling in the course. For a final assignment. Students will have the option of writing a final research paper or to complete a series of shorter writing assignments at set times during the semester. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 1400.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Bazzana

R

03:00pm-05:30pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 1423

The Poetics of Biblical Composition: Foundational Principles of Hebrew Narrative Art

BTI Category

Semester

Languages

FA24

A close study of the principles of compositional art within the Hebrew Bible. Particular attention will be given to stylistic and structural features, to principles of organization, to literary strategy and argumentation, to textual logic, and to the overall expectations made of readers, both ancient and modern. The texts and their underlying principles of design will be considered in the context of major critical debates within the current state of the field.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Teeter

T

03:00pm-04:59pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 1625

Rapid Reading: Classical Hebrew I

BTI Category

Semester

Languages

FA24

This course is designed to assist students in increasing their speed and fluency while reading biblical prose in preparation for graduate level seminars and future study. It will also deepen their knowledge of Hebrew syntax, solidify the Hebrew verbal system, and expand their biblical Hebrew vocabulary. Students will learn and practice useful skills relevant to studying Biblical Hebrew in graduate school and beyond, including reading the critical apparatus of the BHS and interpreting the Masorah. This course is designed to cover large areas of biblical Hebrew narrative while also allowing the students to engage with current scholarship within the field of Hebrew Bible.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Rhyder

R

12:00pm-01:59pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

Prerequisite: HDS 4010 (A and B), HDS 4020, and HDS 4021 or the equivalents. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Classical Hebrew 130AR.

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 1648

Jewish Mysticism and Heresy: From Sabbateanism to Hasidism

BTI Category

Semester

Judaic Studies

FA24

Description:Mystical religion almost always challenges the normative religious tradition in which it is embedded. The focus on the subject, the experiential, and testing the elasticity of doctrinal or behavioral norms, mysticism in some way comes to define aspects of internal heretical positions. This is certainly the case in Judaism. From its appearance on the Middle Ages with the Zohar and later forms of kabbalistic teaching, the suspicion of heresy in mysticism was often a concern expressed by Judaism�s rabbinic elite. This concern was justified in the Sabbatean heresy in the 17th century where a false messiah Sabbatai Zvi shook the Jewish world with claims that redemption had arrived, and prophecy restored. Tragedy unfolded as Sabbatai converted to Islam and his followers developed a mystical messianic doctrine that necessitated his conversion. In its wake came two other messianic/mystical iterations, the heresy of Jacob Frank (1726-1791) and the emergence of Hasidism (late 18th century).This course will explore to nexus of mysticism and heresy in the Sabbatean movement and its aftermath, Frankism, and the rise of Hasidism. Through reading primary sources and scholarship, we will pay close attention to the underlying ways these movement contribute to the fear of heresy and expanding the boundaries of what constitutes heresy in Judaism. We will conclude with some readings on neo-Hasidism and its relationship to both Sabbateanism and Hasidism in a more pluralistic religious context.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Magid, Shaul

W

01:00pm-02:59pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2052

Religion and Liberation Around Toni Morrison and Gabriel Garc�a M�rquez: Writings and Lives

BTI Category

Semester

Sociology/Ethnography/Research Methods

FA24

In 1995 Toni Morrison and Gabriel Garc�a M�rquez met for the first time in Mexico City and spoke about their writings, editors, lives and literary influences. The Colombian writer showed his deep knowledge of Morrison�s novels and Morrison thanked him as a resource for religious themes in her writings. Later, in an interview with Professor Carrasco, Morrison stated, �When I read his book One Hundred Years of Solitude, I literally said, �Oh, my God, you can do this��meaning magic, strange stuff�and be deadly serious. So, that freed me up in my writing. Reading him unlocked something important for me. �This course is a comparative and critical study of the religious dimensions in their writings and lives with special attention to the themes of religious experience, homeland and quests, Africa and Latin America, "rememory" and myths, goodness and the literary imagination. We engage with four types of �texts� and link them together to decipher the ties between the writer�s lives, countries, politics, liberation movements and their writings; autobiographical fragments, novels, film, critical reflections. For Morrison we will use the film �Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am� and interviews as autobiographical fragments. For Garc�a M�rquez we will read his autobiography, Living to Tell the Tale and interviews. Novels include Song of Solomon, Beloved, Home, A Mercy, One Hundred Years of Solitude, Chronicle of a Death Foretold. This course will not be open to auditors. Students have the opportunity to write a research paper, take a final written exam or do a creative project.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Carrasco, David L.

R

12:00pm-0159pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2161

Spiritual Formation in Community

BTI Category

Semester

Practical/Pastoral Theology

FA24

This course explores how Christian communities have taught and formed their members in faith both historically and in the recent past, and charts new directions for spiritual formation in the 21st century. It is especially geared towards those who anticipate having responsibility for a community�s spiritual formation. Students will think critically about the efficacy and appropriateness of inherited educational models, and will be equipped to design and cultivate informed and innovative opportunities for spiritual formation in their own ministry context. Students should leave the course with their own holistic theology of spiritual formation across the lifespan. Readings include classic texts (Augustine, George Herbert, Bonhoeffer) alongside pastoral theologians (John Westerhoff, Maria Harris, Eugene Peterson) and studies by sociologists, developmental psychologists, and educational theorists from religious and secular contexts. May be used to meet MDiv Denominational Polity distribution requirement for Episcopal/Anglican.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Walton

T

03:00pm-04:59pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2196

After Luther: Faith, Will, Law, and the Question of Goodness

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

Is it possible for a person to know and do �the good�? Can we trust in the law, the will, or faith to make us good? These questions were central to Luther�s reforms. Kant, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche, who spent their formative years in a Lutheran context, would also engage these questions in explicit, implicit, and deeply critical ways. Later, theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer drew from all of these authors in order to rethink his own ethics of political resistance to fascism. This course will trace these questions across these five authors in critical conversation with contemporary ethical theorists.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Sanchez

W

01:00pm-04:00pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

Recommended Prep: Prior familiarity with philosophy, theory, or theology.

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2327

Religion and Nationalism in the United States: A History

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

FA24

Many Americans have imagined the United States as having a religious identity as a �city on a hill,� a �redeemer nation,� or �the new Israel.� We will ask several questions in this course: How and why have Americans conceived of the nation in sacred terms? How have religious images of the nation developed and changed over time? Does the United States have a �civil religion�? What is white Christian nationalism, and what are its historic roots? Readings will cover the period from the American Revolution to the present.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Brekus, Catherine

TR

10:30am-11:45am

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2362

Blacks, Jews, and Palestinians

BTI Category

Semester

Sociology/Ethnography/Research Methods

FA24

The late mystic and theologian Howard Thurman once characterized human engagement as a long and winding journey leading to the human heart, where the Augustinian interiority opens itself to the divine and the stranger. �Ultimately there is only one place of refuge on this planet for any [human] �that is in another [human�s] heart. To love is to make of one�s heart a swinging door.� Establishing a place of refuge for another is an ethical imperative, what Thurman called humankind�s �responsibility� to God and humanity. But what happens when the other, neighbor, or stranger has ancestral (or immediate) connections to the destruction, displacement, and death of your familial, cultural, or religious community? Is love possible or justifiable within this context? The course will explore both the ethics and theological grammar of prayer, piety, and �sacred songs� in post-Enlightenment Quakerism and the Abrahamic religions to imagine the possible epistemic grounds for contemplative and deliberative human interaction among groups holding competing and colliding conceptions of memory, truth, moral responsibility, and exile/freedom/ fugitivity. With an emphasis on theory and practice, the course will investigate the tension between what John Rawls called comprehensive beliefs and public reason as well as interrogate the ethics of responsibility and love.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Johnson, Terrence

M

03:00pm-04:59pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

Students must have prior coursework in one of the following areas: African American Studies, Jewish Studies, or Middle East Studies.

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2508

The Human Condition: Selected Twentieth Century Perspectives

BTI Category

Semester

Systematic Theology & Philosophy (Western)

FA24

This seminar will consider philosophical approaches and perspectives offered by five Western twentieth century thinkers on ethics, religion, politics, and our (self) understanding as human beings. Works from Du Bois, Arendt, Fanon, Levinas, and Ricoeur will taken up to interrogate phenomenological, social, political and religious interpretations of the human condition, and our corresponding possibilities and responsibilities.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Lamberth

W

03:00pm-05:45pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

Background in philosophy or theology is suggested but not required. Limited to 12. Course enrollment is by application in early April. Further instructions will be provided on the Canvas course site. Admitted students will be notified on or before the spring enrollment deadline. Seats may reopen in the Fall drop-add period. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 1596.

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2925

Administration and Leadership

BTI Category

Semester

Leadership Formation & Ministry Skills

FA24

This course aims to build skills for imaginative and shared leadership in religious, not-for-profit, and academic institutions. Students will develop skills within three areas: managing self-awareness for leadership, developing strategic approaches to complex situations, and interpreting meaning. At the heart of each class session will be interactive learning experiences that include case studies, role-play, debating, and team-based interviewing of a wide range of administrators and leaders. Because many HDS MDiv and MTS graduates are contributors to communities that encounter complex problems, students will be taught how to shepherd meaning through shared communal processing. This course teaches students how to develop contextual and communal approaches to leadership and administration as opposed to dictatorial forms of leadership. Students will learn that ethical leadership and moral administration begins with humility, keen listening, compassionate engagement (to self and others as well as to new information), and the interrogation and evaluation of their own moral compasses, values, strengths, and immunities to certain forms of change. This course will pay close attention to the complex layers of communal conflict and/or challenges by distinguishing between technical and adaptive challenges. Students will be taught to attend to what matters most in each situation and how to motivate substantive and sustainable responses to adaptive problems. Additionally, the course also shows leaders how to do more than “solve problems”. It teaches students how to forge a more productive understanding of the human interactions, motivations, and fears that play crucial roles in the development of a community’s capacity for change and courageous action.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Crowley

TBA

TBA

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

This is a limited enrollment course. To apply, send a statement to bcrowley@hds.harvard.edu answering the following: 1. What program are you in at HDS? 2. Why do you want to take this class and how do you envision this course benefitting you? 3. Please summarize your background in the areas of administration and leadership. Are you currently, have you ever been, or do you desire to be a leader or administrator? 4. What do you want to learn about administration and leadership?

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2990

Unitarian Universalist Polity and Practices: Seminar

BTI Category

Semester

Church Polity/Canon Law

FA24

This course will explore the history, theology and development of congregational polity as an expression of Unitarian Universalist values and tradition. From current issues of polity in Unitarian Universalist institutions to the varied roots in Unitarian, Universalist, and Unitarian Universalist history, we will explore how decisions are made and how power functions. What is the role of ministers and of laity in congregations? What sources of authority support the exercise of power and processes of decision-making? In what ways do questions of polity undergird practices of worship as well as rites of passage? How do the minister and congregation work together to shape a shared understanding of polity? Through all of these questions, we will consider the impact of social location and dynamics of power.

Professor

Class Day & Time

TBA

TBA

TBA

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3057

Intro to Islam through Prophetic Traditions

BTI Category

Semester

Islamic Studies

FA24

This course will engage in a critical reading and analysis of well-known Muslim prophetic traditions and a study of the practices of the Prophet Muhammad. Through analysis of Muslim prophetic traditions, such as “Hadith Jibril,” we will develop an understanding of the Islamic value systems, Islamic manners/etiquette and Prophetic Character. The fundamental building blocks such as Islam (the physical surrender of the body), Iman (internal truth), and Ihsan (excellence and beauty) will be closely examined. We will focus on Muslim spiritual care through these building blocks during the semester. We will also develop a framework for understanding core Islamic sciences, such as: Jurisprudence, creed/theology, and spiritual purification. Throughout various modalities and exercises, we will study how this framework can enable a deeper understanding of the practical issues affecting the lives of Muslims. We will have expert guest speakers from different disciplines such as pastoral care/chaplaincy (ministry), poetry & literature, counseling, psychology, education, social work, and medicine throughout the semester. These specialists will give us perspectives and practical tips on how prophetic traditions are applied in a Muslim’s life. This course will provide a basic understanding of the Islamic religion through the eyes of Muslims, while providing an in-depth understanding of the various dimensions of Islamic practices. Students from different backgrounds, with or without prior experience with Islam, will find much enrichment in this course diving into the practice through the lenses of prophetic traditions.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Kumek

M

12:00pm-01:59pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3118

American Heretics

BTI Category

Semester

Sociology/Ethnography/Research Methods

FA24

This course explores the rise and role "irreligion" and "irreligious" or "heretical" ideas and thinkers in American religious/irreligious history, including proponents of Deism, Freethinkers, Transcendentalism, and Spiritualism and extending forward into the present day to include the New Atheists, Secular Humanists, Spiritual-But-Not-Religious, �Nones,� and others who do not identify with traditional religious institutions. The course uncovers on the interactions of these groups with 1) their more religiously traditional neighbors, including Catholics, Mainline and Evangelical Protestants, Jews, etc. and 2) the government of the United States and various state laws and institutions. This course explores the history of anti-religious, a-religious, and multi-religious movements and their influence in American society today, including as a form of social critique within the abolitionist, suffragist, civil rights, feminist, and womanist movements. "Heretical" ideas often later become religiously normative (such as ordaining women), while others remain irreligious, and this course explores reasons for each. This course includes exploration of 'primary texts' from heretical authors and secondary academic historical analysis to create a portrait of a diverse and ongoing thread in American intellectual history. This is a limited enrollment course. Interested students should attend the first course meeting. If the course is overenrolled, a selection procedure will be described at that first meeting. Selected students will then be invited to enroll in the course by the second meeting day.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Sanford

TR

03:00pm-04:15pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3158

Moctezuma's Mexico Then and Now: The Past, the Present and Pandemics in North America

BTI Category

Semester

Sociology/Ethnography/Research Methods

FA24

This course provides students with the opportunity to explore how the study of pre-Hispanic and Colonial Mexican and Latinx cultures provide vital context for understanding today's changing world. The emphasis is on the mythical and social origins, glory days and political collapse of the Aztec Empire and Maya civilizations as a pivot to the study of the sexual, religious and racial interactions of the Great Encounter between Mesoamerica, Africa, Europe, and the independent nations of Mexico and the United States. The study of the archaeology, artistic media, cosmovision, capital cities, human sacrifice and the religious devotions of ancient Mesoamerica and the nature and impact of the devastating pandemic wrought by the arrival of European diseases in 1519 illuminate the Day of the Dead and Virgin of Guadalupe phenomena today. Special access to the photographic record of marvelous objects at the Peabody Museum aids in examining new concepts of race, nation and the persistence of Moctezuma�s Mexico in Latinx identities in the Mexico-US Borderlands. One of the biggest student/museum events at Harvard is the Day of the Dead celebrations at the Peabody Museum, which provides the opportunity for students to work directly with the materiality of the longue duree of Mexico's storied history and evocative worldview. The museum collections and sections exercises provide the students with ways to integrate their classroom work to the objects and public program of the museum, plus experience community both locally and across cultural boundaries and physical borders. This course empowers our students to evaluate the ways the U.S. is changing and struggling to define itself in relation to Latin America and especially the migration of peoples, ideas, arts, music, food from and through Mexico now taking place during a new pandemic, 500 years after the first one that resulted from the Great Encounter. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as GENED 1148.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Carrasco

MW

12:00pm-01:15pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3176

What is Islam?

BTI Category

Semester

Islamic Studies

FA24

What are the academic approaches to studying Islam? How do our academic approaches help us engage the question: what is Islam? This course begins by considering how 'Islam' is an object of academic inquiry but remains primarily concerned with the most prominent elements of Islam and being Islamic that have been marginalized within Islamic studies. It acknowledges the methodological difficulties involved in pursuing research on the phenomenon and practice of Islam across social contexts of the past and the present, while discussing possible methods of studying Islam as the religion lived by Muslims and even non-Muslims. Students will be introduced to academic and religious sources that encourage us to (re)approach Islam as the everyday experience of believers, the multiverse of rituals and exercises of knowledge acquisition, as well as contests over moral authority. Students will, moreover, be encouraged to consider if a focus on lived Islam encourages us to discard regnant dichotomies of 'textual' and 'popular' religion, along with imagined divisions of the Islamic world into a center and peripheries. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 1807.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Sevea

M

05:00pm-07:00pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3247

Knowing Animals: Buddhist and Posthuman Resources for a New Interspecies Ethics

BTI Category

Semester

Buddhist Studies

FA24

A constructive exercise in the optimal epistemic orientations and bodily habits for post-human life on planet Earth, with focus on the plight, and value, of animals. This course will study exemplary new writing in animal phenomenology, philosophical ethics, and animal ethology. Buddhist resources will include cosmology, the epistemology of seeing, and the epistemology of compassion. Practices of seeing will also be cultivated through out-of-class exercises as well as videos for in-class watching. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 1760.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Gyatso

WF

10:30am-11:45am

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3339

Exploring the Quran

BTI Category

Semester

Islamic Studies

FA24

This course explores the contents of the Quran and probes its place in the history of human civilization. Students will learn about and critically reflect on the following subjects: 1) the Quran's core ideas, stories, laws, parables, and arguments; 2) the historical context in which the Quran was first promulgated and codified; 3) the relationship between the Quran and the preceding literary traditions of the ancient world, in particular the Bible and post-biblical Jewish and Christian writings; and 4) Muslim utilization of the Quran towards religious, intellectual, social, and cultural ends. To meet these goals, we will read a substantial portion of the Quran in translation and draw extensively on modern academic scholarship on the Quran. In addition, lectures will contextualize and complement our encounter with the Quranic text and secondary scholarship. By the end of the semester, students should have the ability to utilize various resources and concordances in order to independently conduct further investigations and critically evaluate claims made about the Quran. Course will have a required discussion section and an optional Arabic section for interested students who have at least two years of Arabic. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 1803.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Goudarzi

W

04:00pm-07:00pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3751

Who Needs God? Rethinking God in Light of Hindu and Christian Theologies

BTI Category

Semester

Interreligious Learning

FA24

This course reflects on God reconsidered in light of modern and postmodern doubts about the very idea of �God,� in cultures where belief in God, and even understanding of God, is waning. What does needing God mean, for whom? The questions are raised in light of Hindu and Christian scriptures, from philosophical and theological perspectives, and with reference to spiritual paths to union with God in these great traditions. What is missing, if God is missing? Readings include: selected scriptural texts; St. Bonaventure�s Christian Journey of the Mind to God, Sri Sankara's great Goddess hymn, Ocean of Beauty; the 19th century mystics Ramakrishna and T�r�se of Lisieux; 20th century prophets of compassion and justice, Mohandas K. Gandhi and Dorothy Day. Comparing Hindu and Christian traditions on God challenge 21st century ideas of God, religion, self, but the course strongly welcomes insights from other traditions ancient and modern. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Science as Religion 1059. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Science as Religion 1059.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Clooney

MW

10:30am-11:45am

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3956

Buddhist Stories: Narrative, Narrative Ethics, and Moral Anthropology

BTI Category

Semester

Buddhist Studies

FA24

This course is a practicum on reading Buddhist stories, learning from them, and living with them. We will engage some exemplary Buddhist stories from three orientations: how to read them well using resources of Narratology; how to use them in moral reflection and ethical understanding; and how they can illuminate who we are as moral beings and help us develop richer lives. We will also explore the connection between narrative ethics and other forms of ethical reflection as well as the relevance of recent cognitive studies about "the moral brain."The Buddhist stories will be selected from across the Buddhist world and from different time periods.No previous study of Buddhism is expected.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Hallisey

R

09:00am-10:59am

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 4052

Elementary Pali I

BTI Category

Semester

Languages

FA24

The first in a two-year program of courses designed to enable the student to read Buddhist canonical materials in Pali independently. In addition to giving the student a comprehensive understanding of all grammatical forms found in the texts, the program will also equip them with a range of interpretive techniques to help them draw out as fully as possible the meanings of the texts. This course introduces students to major elements of grammar found in Pali. It also introduces the language patterns found in standard prose works to facilitate independent reading. The course is geared toward getting the student to read canonical Pali texts as quickly as possible, and readings in the textbook are taken from key canonical texts. The student is thus engaging with key canonical materials from the very beginning of the course.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Chrystall

MWF

09:00am-10:00am

Grading Option