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CHURCH HISTORY & HISTORY OF RELIGIONS

School

Boston University Graduate Program in Religion

GRS RN 682

History of Religion in Pre-Colonial Africa

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

The study of the development of religious traditions in Africa during the period prior to European colonialism. An emphasis on both indigenous religions and the growth and spread of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in the continent as a whole. Also offered as CAS AA 382 and CAS HI 349. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Historical Consciousness.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Thornton

TR

9:30-10:45am

Grading Option

Letter/PF/Audit

Credits

4

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC7179

History of Western Christianity III: Catholicism from the French Revolution to Vatican II

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

What John O'Malley, S.J. calls the Church's "long nineteenth century," from the French revolution to the 1950's, although often considered a period of secularization, was also a great age of renewal for the Roman Catholic Church. It witnessed a tremendous institutional growth of the Church, the assertion of doctrinal and administrative control from Rome known as ultramontanism, the flowering of spirituality and devotional life, and the spread of the faith from Europe throughout the world by means of extensive missionary activity. This course will consider the institutional and intellectual transformation of the Church in the nineteenth century, but will also pay close attention to changes in popular piety and the social role of the Church. Focus will be both topical and regional.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Jeffrey von Arx, S.J.

MW

8:30-9:50 PM

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC7301

Tolkien: Catholicism, History, and Myth

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This course will examine the literary works of J.R.R. Tolkien (author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, among others) in primarily a historical framework, but also with attention to Tolkien's Catholic worldview. Tolkien was a scholar of medieval literature as well as a fantasy author. He intended his fictional Middle Earth to represent not only a new national myth-cycle for the English people, but also a particularly Catholic worldview, potentially counter to the landscape of industrialization and World War I. This course will examine these themes and present a narrative concerned with the middle ages, medievalisms, and early 20th-century Catholicism as refracted through Tolkien's lenses. It will also consider discussions of race in Tolkien's thought, linguistics, and various adaptations of his work as well as his relationship with C.S. Lewis and the other members of the Inklings (his writers' group).

Professor

Class Day & Time

Stephen Molvarec, S.J.

W

1:30-3:50 PM

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC8143

Aquinas's Summa contra Gentiles

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This course aims to introduce students to Thomas Aquinas's first and only complete summa, the Summa contra Gentiles (ScG; 1259-65). In spite of its considerable depth and its more extensive treatment of certain central theological and philosophical themes (e.g., God, proofs of divine existence, providence) as compared to the Summa theologiae (ST), the ScG is read and studied far less frequently than his mature ST. Unlike the ST, the ScG is written in an accessible discursive-prose format, it is a complete summa, and its comparative brevity means that it can be read and carefully studied over the course of one semester.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Franklin T. Harkins

W

10 AM-12:50 PM

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

Y

Notes

One graduate level HC (History of Christianity) course

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC8148

Stones, Bones, Spaces and Places: A History of Christianity's Relationship with the Material World

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This course will explore the relationship of Christians with the material world and with materiality particularly during Antiquity and the Middle Ages, but with some contemporary discussion as well. Christians, on the one hand, have embraced materiality on account of the incarnation and resurrection of Jesus. On the other hand, some Christians have preferred to find a tension between the material and the spiritual. This course will explore those perspectives as well as the material culture of Christianity in its places, objects, relics, and thought. Students will encounter historical methodologies including the reconstruction of landscape and soundscape as well as theories of material culture.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Stephen Molvarec, S.J.

T

3:30-5:30 PM

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

Y

Notes

At least one previous graduate level course in Church History or History

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO5794-01

Philosophy and the Church Fathers

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

Introduction to the major Church Fathers and Christian schools of antiquity and their varying engagement with philosophy. Elements of opposition and areas of harmony between Greek and Christian ideals.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Schatkin

M

3-5:25p

Grading Option

L/PF/A

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

Grad/Undergrad split

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO7046-01

Early Christian Ascetical Theology

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This course concerns various theologies of the ascetical life in Early Christianity. The course will begin by asking just what Christian asceticism is, both in distinction from the asceticism of Jewish and Hellenistic traditions, and on its own terms. The second unit of the course will pursue questions of how Christian ascetics speak, especially insofar as this is shaped by biblical narrative. Here we will treat cenobitic and eremetical traditions, and the theological import of monastic rules. The final unit will concern theologies of grace and union with God, with special interest in the tradition of divinization in Greek Christianity.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Magree

T

4:30-6:50p

Grading Option

L/PF/A

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

DOCTORAL

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO7048-01

Genealogies of Catholicism: The Problem of Franciscan Modernity

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

Famously, Heidegger accused nearly all western philosophy of ontotheology, the naming of God as Being and everything else as manifestations or participations in that metaphysical scheme, a manifestation of the human desire to grasp, to comprehend, and thus, in some measure, to manipulate and control reality as such, the ultimate extension of humantechne, our capacity to manipulate the world. Such a metaphysics, he averred, deprives Being of its deep mystery by claiming to know its nature as such, and thus to grasp it and make it useful. In the end, it is little more than a more refined and civilized dimension of the Nietzschean will to power. Ever since, scholars have sought the precise origins and development of this pernicious modernity. Also famously, so-called Radical Orthodox thinkers have sketched an influential genealogy of this modernity that extends through Suarez back to Scotus, and then hinted that behind Scotuss error may be even Bonaventure. In the preface to the second edition ofTheology and Social Theory, John Milbank traces this first step through to the Scotist leap and the modern tumble into the ontotheological slough, labeling this bad tradition Franciscan modernity. While this narrative has recently come in for trenchant criticism, it remains widely and resiliently prevalent. This seminar, accordingly, seeks to canvas the problem of Franciscan modernity, critically assessing the accuracy and utility of this genealogical narrative, beginning with its sources in the late Middle Ages and then surveying its modern proponents and detractors.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Coolman

R

10-12:25p

Grading Option

L/PF/A

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

DOCTORAL

School

Boston University School of Theology

STH TH827

History of U.S. Christianity

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

The development of American Christianity as a social, intellectual, institutional, and cultural movement. The course includes visits to churches in Boston.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Evans

R

3:30pm-6:15pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

Y

Notes

PREREQ: TF701/702 or equivalent.

School

Boston University School of Theology

STH TH860

Female Medieval Mystics

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

Not currently available

Professor

Class Day & Time

Boyer (Pak)

W

6:30pm-9:15pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

Currently full, taking waitlist

School

Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary-Hamilton

CH502

The Church since the Reformation

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

A general survey of the history of the Christian church from the beginnings of the Protestant Reformation in the sixteenth century to the present time.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Isaac, Gordon

M

9am-12pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3704

Religion and Society in Nigeria: Seminar

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

Religion is pivotal to the understanding of the history, culture, and politics of Nigeria's nation-state. The seminar examines the historical development of religion in Nigeria and explores its intersection with ethnic identity, culture, and society in pre-colonial, colonial, and contemporary periods. The course provides an understanding of various cultural traditions, historical events, and social forces that have shaped - and continue to shape - Nigeria's religious experiences and expression. The course will explore many topical issues, such as indigenous religious culture, Christian and Muslim identities, Islam, Christianity, and the state, civil religion; Muslim-Christian relations; religion and law; civil society and democratization, as well as many important interpretations of religion and politics in present-day Nigeria. Jointly offered as African and African American Studies 192x.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Jacob Olupona

T

3-5:45PM

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2248

The Medium and the Mission: Technology and Communication in Global Christianity

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This course will explore the many diverse mediums through which Christianity travels around the globe to save, heal, touch, prophecy and connect Christian communities from diverse places. In order to do so, we will combine ethnographic case studies and theoretical analysis. The case studies will vary in locale (providing a global scope) and in the medium. Some weeks might consist of a Zoom visit from a Pentecostal deliverance minister or faith healer. Others might require watching a Pentecostal Ghallywood film. Some weeks might center on technology as a material object, while still others will consider television programming, radio programming, telegraphs, or the ubiquity of the Jesus Film. This ethnographic breadth seeks to capture some of the dynamism of medium in World Christianity.
We will pair each case study with a theoretical consideration of how technology has played a significant role in shaping Christian ideas of the human, sin, senses, the body, transference/impartation, gifts, evangelism, and the world around them. While considering these topics, special attention will be paid to how marginalized communities have incorporated various mediums as means of resistance. Assignments will include participation in class conversations, leading seminar discussions, analyzing diverse mediums, and a final paper.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Nathanael Homewood

M

12-2PM

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2390B

Colloquium in American Religious History

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

Presentation and discussion of the research of doctoral candidates in American religious history. Available, with instructors' permission, to Harvard doctoral students in other fields of religious studies or American studies. Note: Second half of an academic year bi-weekly course. Credit will not be earned unless both the fall and spring semester of the course is completed. Course may be taken on a Sat/unsat basis only.Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 3505B.

Professor

Class Day & Time

David Holland

T

6-8PM

Grading Option

P/F

Credits

4

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

Y

Notes

PREREQ: HDS 2390A

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3309

Solar Theology in the Ancient Mediterranean

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This course will introduce students to the various solar theologies of the ancient Mediterranean world, including Egypt, Greece, Persia, Rome, and Syria. Topics to be explored include: the relationship of solar theology to monotheism and polytheism; solar theology and imperial ideology; solar theology and philosophy (espcially Platonism); and the influence of solar theology on early Christianity. All readings will be in translation, and no knowledge of ancient languages is required. Previous coursework in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean is recommended, but not required. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 1321.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Charles Stang

T

3-5PM

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3081

God's Nations: Religion, Nationalism and Modernity

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

1. Nationalism is not simply an ideology: it is also a set of practices by which territory, political power and the cultural identity of the people that inhabit this territory are constituted in a unique and singular fact. The religious dimension of nationalism has been infrequently analyzed by historians and even less so by social scientists who, operating under the influence of theories of modernization, have perceived nationalism and religion as incompatible. In the last three decades however, with the growth of religious claims in diverse national and international contexts, scholars have started to explore the connection between religion and nationalism. In this course we shall:analyze the historical links between religion and nation in Western Europe and the United States from the rise of the nation-state until today.
2. explore the diffusion of the concept of nation-state worldwide and its consequences on the politicization of religion in diverse countries: Turkey, India, Russia and China.
3. discuss religious nationalism "beyond nations" as exemplified by the globalization of religiously-based political claims from Islamism to evangelicalism.The scope of religions and national cultures covered in class will help students understand the major issues at stake such as state and religion relationships, religiously based political parties and movements, populism, anti Semitism and Islamophobia.
The course will benefit students interested in academic careers in the emerging field of religion and politics. It will also provide professional resources and networking opportunities for students aiming at professional careers in the field of media as well as religion and policy making domestically and internationally.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Jocelyne Cesari

T

12-2PM

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

Enrollment is limited to 15. Permission to enroll in the course will be granted as petitions are received.

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3087

African American Religious History

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This graduate seminar course provides a critical survey of and introduction to major themes, debates, and trajectories in the field of African American Religious History. We will examine the multiple and manifold meanings of "African American religions" with attention to Christian denominational histories and extra-church, non-Christian, and quasi-Christian religious formations and interventions among people of African descent in the United States. To do so, students will be introduced to key historical events, prominent and unsung religious actors and institutions, and a diversity of theoretical and methodological approaches to investigating, analyzing, and narrating the archives of African American religious life and culture. Jointly offered as Religion 1089.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Ahmad Greene-Hayes

T

9-11AM

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

4

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology

INDS 7100 H1

The Ecumenical Movement-TheSources

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

The Ecumenical Movement that started in the second half of the 19th century does not constitute an ideology but rather reflects the authentic commitment to reconcile divided Christians in the unity of the Church and the reality of communion. Throughout the past century, the quest for Christian unity has assumed many shapes and forms that may be studied through major documents produced along the history of the 20th century and beyond. This course will define the boundaries of Ecumenism and its challenges for contemporary Orthodoxy by looking inward as well as outward as faithful and thoughtful Christians.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Rev. Dr. Nicholas Kazarian

M

6:30-8:50p

Grading Option

L/PF/AUD

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

HYBRID

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology

PATR 7150 Z1

The Filioque in the Byz. Fathers

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

From St Photios in the ninth century to St Mark of Ephesus in the fifteenth, the Fathers of the middle and late Byzantine periods dedicated a great deal of their theological output to the issue of the Filioque--the Latin doctrine (rejected by the Orthodox Church) that the Holy Spirit proceeds "also from the Son." This course examines this facet of the Orthodox patristic tradition, from the early Fathers through the Council of Florence, with special attention to the events surrounding the Council of 879, the anti-Latin polemics surrounding the Council of Lyons in 1274, and the hesychast theology that developed in the wake of St Gregory Palamas.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Dr. Tikhon Alexander Pino

TBD

TBD

Grading Option

L/PF/AUD

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

ASYNCHRONOUS/ONLINE

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Saint John's Seminary

CH502

Church History II

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This survey course aims to introduce students to the history of the Catholic Church from the beginning of the sixteenth century to the present day. Through an examination of the historical narrative, including its key periods, movements, and figures, students will come to a deeper understanding of the history of the Catholic Church in the modern period.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Dr. Coughlin

TR

10:30-11:45 AM

Grading Option

Letter/Audit

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC7027

History of Western Christianity II, 850-1650

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

General survey of Western Christianity, with special emphasis on institutional, theological, pastoral and spiritual issues. Lays the foundation for understanding many features of the Church today. Topics include monasticism, establishment of the modern papacy, lay apostolic movements (e.g. beguines), religious orders (e.g., Franciscans, Jesuits), heresies, crusades, inquisitions, scholasticism, saints (e.g., Hildegard of Bingen, Francis of Assisi, Ignatius of Loyola), popular devotions, women in church, mysticism, Protestant Reformation, church councils (e.g., Trent), overseas evangelization. Lectures, readings in primary sources, focused discussion.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Catherine M. Mooney

T

12:30-2:50 PM

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC7230

Medieval Theology

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

The course provides an historical introduction to Christian theology in the medieval West, c. 400 - c. 1400, with a focus on medieval scholasticism. Fundamental themes include modes of theological discourse, scriptural exegesis, monasticism, mysticism, and scholasticism. The course considers how such theologians as Augustine of Hippo, Pseudo-Dionysius, Bede, Anselm of Canterbury, Bernard of Clairvaux, Hugh and Richard of St. Victor, Robert of Melun, Peter Lombard, Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Bonaventure, Mechthild of Magdeburg, Gertrude of Helfta, and John Duns Scotus understood such central theological topics as the natural knowledge of God, divine revelation, Trinity, creation, the human person, sin, evil, grace, predestination, Christ, mystical union, the Virgin Mary, salvation, and the sacraments.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Franklin T. Harkins

F

9:00 AM -12:00 PM

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC7303

Screening Saints & Sanctity

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This course explores saints as they are depicted in award-winning films, primary sources by or about the saints, and scholarly sources regarding the saints and their subsequent portrayals by film directors. These latter figures - modern hagiographers - contribute toward constructing a given saint's image as the saint is popularly understood. Exploring the historical contexts of both the saint in question and his or her later interpreter will illuminate the pressing theological, religious, ecclesial, social, and political concerns in their respective eras. The course aims to elevate teaching and preaching regarding these multi-layered perspectives on saints and notions of sanctity.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Catherine M. Mooney

R

3:30-5:30 PM

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC8144

The Spiritual Theology of Ignatius of Loyola

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), primary founder of the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits), produced the largest collection of writings of any sixteenth-century figure, excepting only Philip Melanchton (1497-1560). In this seminar course, students will examine the entire Ignatius corpus with regard to salient themes to assess their development over the course of Ignatius' life and how they should be reinterpreted (or not) for twenty-first century Christians. This course is recommended for those intending advanced studies in Jesuit history and spirituality.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Barton T. Geger

T

1:00-3:30 PM

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

Y

Notes

At least one year of graduate theology OR a previous class on Ignatian spirituality/Jesuit history.

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO5559-01

Dante's 'Divine Comedy' in Translation

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

Conducted in English. Elective for Italian major or minor. An introduction to and critical reading of the "Divine Comedy" (in English translation), one of the world's greatest epic poems, produced by "the chief imagination of Christendom" (Yeats). Dante's journey through Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise will be analyzed at its multiple levels of interpretation: literal and allegorical, theological, philosophical, political, and literary. Compendium of an entire epoch of European civilization, the "Comedy" will also be interrogated for its responses to the fundamental questions of human existence: God, the Cosmos, the Self, Good and Evil, Right and Wrong, Suffering, and Happiness.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Costanzo

W

3-5:25p

Grading Option

L/PF/A

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

Grad/Undergrad split

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO7008-01

Early Christianity in its Jewish Context

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

The course surveys the Jewish context of early Christian literature and history through close analysis of primary texts. We begin with the origins of Jewish sectarianism in the second century BCE and study the development of various Jewish and Christian sects, concluding with Jewish and Christian groups in the second century CE. We will explore how closely related, and in many cases inseparable, Christian and Jewish identity were well into the second century CE.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Gillihan

F

1-3:20p

Grading Option

L/PF/A

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

DOCTORAL

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO7047-01

Marcion and the History of Early Christianity

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This course offers an in-depth study of Marcion, one of the most significant heretics ofthe second century CE, and his impact upon and place within early Christianity. The first half of the course will focus on the portrayal of Marcion found in the writings of several of his most prominent opponents, including, e.g., Justin Martyr, Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria, Tertullian, Epiphanius, and Origen. The second half hones in on elements of Marcion's theology and texts, along with the proto-orthodox polemic against them, including topics such as Marcion's dualism, ecclesiology, Gospel, Apostolikon, points of contact with ancient philosophies, and "disciples."

Professor

Class Day & Time

Roth

M

2-4:25p

Grading Option

L/PF/A

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

DOCTORAL

School

Boston University School of Theology

STH TH826

Reformations

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

Survey of social, personal, institutional, and theological aspects of reform and renewal in the late medieval and early modern periods, including Nominalism, Conciliarism, the papacy, Luther, the German and Swiss Reformations, Anabaptism and radical reformers, Calvin, the French Reformation, the English Reformation, Catholic Reform, Ignatius and Theresa, and the Council of Trent.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Brown

M

8:00am-10:45am

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

Y

Notes

PREREQ: TF701/702 or equivalent.

School

Boston University School of Theology

STH TH853

Christianity in Colonial Latin America

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

Christianity in Colonial Latin America is a graduate-level survey course that introduces students to the historical trajectory of Christianity in Latin America from the arrival of Christopher Columbus (1492) to the period of the Latin American wars of independence (1791-1821). Attention is given to the encounter with pre-Colombian religions as well as the transactional adaptation of core Christian theological, institutional, and ascetical traditions. Accordingly, special consideration will be given to theological discourses of the other, the adaptation of ecclesiastical institutions such as the episcopacy, and missionary practices. Reading selections include primary source material as well as secondary scholarly literature. Students will have the opportunity to acquire both a general appreciation for the historical trajectory of Christianity during the colonial period as well as an in depth understanding of selected topics intended for independent research.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Roldan Figueroa

R

12:30pm-3:15pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston University School of Theology

STH TM863

African Christianity: Narratives, Beliefs, and Practices

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This course examines the history of Christianity in Africa, with focus on the 19th-21st centuries. It pays particular attention to themes in African theology, gender and social action, environmentalism, Pentecostal spiritualities, African missions, and church/state relations-- including issues of colonialism and democratization. A highlight of the course will be a conference on African Christian Biography with leading scholars, in late October.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Robert with Wariboko

F

8:00am-10:45am

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary-Hamilton

WM601

The World Mission of the Church

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

Recognizing the responsibility of all Christians to complete Christ's commission, this course gives an overview of the strategic and historical progress of worldwide missions today. The ways in which a local congregation can fulfill its worldwide biblical mandate are also considered.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Yao, Xiyi

Module 4: Feb. 23-24; Mar. 22-23; Apr. 26-27

Fri 6:30-9:30pm; Sat 8:30am-4:30pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

SYNCHRNOUS

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2220

Teresa of Avila

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This conference course will explore the life and work of the sixteenth-century Spanish writer, mystic and reformer, Teresa of Avila. With attention to her religious, literary, political and social context, we will read her major works: her Life, Interior Castle, Way of Perfection, Book of Foundations and her commentary on the Song of Songs as well as her poetry and documents related to her reform of the Carmelite Order. The format of the course will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, and, depending on the size of enrollment, reading our work aloud to each other.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Stephanie Paulsell

T

3-5:45PM

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 1260

History of Early Christianity

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This course will provide a basic historical introduction to early Christianity from the first to fourth centuries CE. How did different Christians in this period navigate the diverse teachings, rituals, and social practices associated with Jesus of Nazareth to produce a religious movement that came to dominate the Roman Empire, even as it was itself always complex, variegated, and internally contested from its earliest moments? Throughout the course, we will explore the diversity of early Christian thought and practice across a range of topics and geographical areas, as well as the ways in which Christians situated themselves within the larger Roman world and in relation to others both internal and external. This is an introductory-level course and it offers the possibility of writing a research paper. Note that the course is designed to complement and build upon HDS 1202 "Introduction to the New Testament." Each can be taken as a standalone class or the two can be taken in any order; but overlap between them will be kept to a minimum. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 2432.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Giovanni Bazzana

TR

9-10:15AM

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Online?

N

Prerequisite?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2069

Mysticism and Madness in the Early Modern World

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

There was no period more significant to the development of Catholicism than early modernity. Faced both with the competing truth claims of the Protestant Reformation and encounter with new and unknown cultures, the Catholic Church reaffirmed or redefined itself and many of its major tenets. Three of the most significant and interrelated of these concepts that required review were sanctity, martyrdom, and mysticism. They were central to early modern Catholic theology and devotion, and yet saints, martyrs, and mystics were liminal figures. They were caught between orthodoxy and heterodoxy, cultural heroes, and counter cultural. This seminar explores these tensions as they manifested themselves in the early modern world, with special attention to analysis of primary source texts. Topics examined include mission history, gender, and history of the body.