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ETHICS

School

Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary-Hamilton

SE630

Redeeming Capitalism

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

To help students understand the relationship between theology and economics and to apply what they have learned to their ministries and/or Christian discipleship.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Barnes, Ken

See notes

Fri 6:30-9:30pm; Sat 8:30am-4:30pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Online?

Synchronous

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

Oct. 4-5, Nov. 1-2, Dec. 6-7

School

Hartford International

WS-600-2

Eco-Spirituality

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

Eco-Spirituality: This course invites students into experiential immersion in the sacred wild as a central dimension of human spiritual and/or religious life. Focusing on themes of beauty, biophilia (and biophobia), and love, the course encompasses eco-philosophy, science, and a range of religious and non-religious spiritual voices relating to love of Earth and one’s local place, along with weekly outdoor practices inviting students into practices of encounter and deepening relationship with creatures, places, and the divine. At the heart of this course is the relation between human environmental- and generational-justice questions and the destruction of beauty in late capitalism – along with examples and resources for sustaining hope, action, and the renewal of the beauty that sustains all that is.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Dahill

W

5-7pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Online?

Y

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology

ETHC 5001

Orthodox Christian Ethics

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

Christian moral theology is concerned with virtue not as an end in itself, but as an indispensable, challenging, and rewarding dimension of the Good Life, the Life in Christ. As such, a proper aim of Christian ethics is happiness, or rather blessedness; thus, St. Seraphim of Sarov's famous dictum: The goal of the Christian life is the acquisition of the Holy Spirit. Taking our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and the Panaghia as our primary ethical models, the class considers the meaning and shape of 'right action' within the matrix of Uncreated Grace.

Professor

Class Day & Time

TO BE ANNOUNCED

R

2:40-5 PM

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Online?

Y

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMCE7008

Introduction to Catholic Social Ethics

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

This course introduces the rich tradition of social ethics engaged explicitly by Leo XIII, Rerum novarum (1891), continued by his successors and bishops conferences, and enriched by theological reflection that continues today. Attention will be given to the principal documents (encyclicals, Gaudium et spes (1965), pastoral letters), and the contexts from which they emerged to gain facility in applying social analysis to contemporary concerns. Key themes to be studied: life and dignity of the human person, solidarity, social participation and the common good, the preferential option for the poor, and economic development and work, among others.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Mary Jo Iozzio

W

1:00-3:50

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMCE7300

Race, Gender, and Ethics

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

This course asks how critical reflection on gender and race challenges and may improve Christian conversations about God, faith, moral agency and obligation, culture, and social issues. It will begin by introducing students to feminist ethics, and to a range of methods and concerns that theologians and ethicists in conversation with this literature have addressed. It will then introduce students to the concerns and methods of womanist theologians and other scholars who complement this critical attention to gender with attention to race and ethnicity, as well as other aspects of personhood and social location. It will pay particular attention throughout to the varying conceptions of moral agency, moral obligation, and justice that are proposed by these literatures.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Christina McRorie

F

1:00-4:00

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMCE8062

Relational Ethics: Body, Gender and Sex

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

The course studies human sexuality in light of the contributions that come from human experience and human sciences, biblical scholarship, theological insights and debates, and the Catholic Magisterium. Personal dimensions (e.g., bodiliness, development, orientation, identity, affectivity), social components (e.g., gender, economic dynamics), and historical shifts will be highlighted. The anthropological, hermeneutic, and phenomenological approaches that will be privileged allow us to discuss behaviors and practices critically and to strengthen and promote virtuous and just relationships.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Mary Jo Iozzio

T

9:30-12:10

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

One moral/ethics (grad or advanced undergrad level)

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO5006-01

Sexualities and Spiritualities

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

Can you be Queer and spiritual? Trans or non-binary and religious? Straight, hooking up, and Catholic? Can you combine pleasure and piety? Of course you can. But how? This course surveys progressive thinkers examining the close relationship of sexuality, gender, the body, and spirituality. We look at evolving views of marriage and single life. We reflect on sexual violence. We ask how traditional religion distorts or supports these issues. Catholic, Protestant, and Episcopal authors explore developments and disagreements! -- that nurture authentically spiritual sexuality. The aim is to promote understanding and care for self and others. Graduates and undergraduates welcome.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Weiss

R

4:30-6:50p

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

UNDERGRAD/GRAD SPLIT

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO5200-01

Christian Ethics and Gender Justice

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

This seminar will consider Christian ethics and gender justice as regarding sex, marriage, family, and social roles. The primary focus will be on women and men, masculinity and femininity; transgender, nonbinary gender, and fluid gender identities will be included. Development of gender ethics within 20 th and 21 st century Roman Catholic teaching documents will provide an opening framework. Debates will be engaged with feminist, womanist, Latine, African, and Asian theologians.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Cahill

W

2-4:25p

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

UNDERGRAD/GRAD SPLIT

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO5574-01

Ethics, Religion, and International Politics

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

An examination of the role of religion in international politics and of ethical approaches to international affairs. Special emphasis will be given to religion as a source of conflict, religious communities as transnational agents for justice, protection of human rights, and peace; the historical development and contemporary formulations of ethical norms for the use of force; and ethical and religious contributions to reconciliation and solidarity.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Owens

MW

1:30-2:45

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

GRAD/UGRAD SPLIT, REQUIRED DISCUSSION: THEO5574-03 (T, 1-2p), -04 (R, 2-3p), -05 (R, 3-4p), -06 (R, 4-5p)

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO7029-01

Biotechnologies, Health, and Theological Ethics

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

In dialogue with scientists, philosophers, and theological ethicists, the doctoral seminar examines current advances in developing scientific disciplines and studies their ethical challenges for health and society by relying on theological ethics. After reflecting on biotechnology in general, in its two parts the seminar focuses, first, on biotechnologies that directly affect human health by considering human genetics (genetic information, research, testing, screening, editing, therapy, pharmacogenomics, and enhancement), stem cell research, regenerative medicine, oncofertility, and neuroscience. Second, the seminar studies new biotechnologies that indirectly regard human health: synthetic biology, nanotechnology, cybertechnology, robotics, artificial intelligence, transhumanism, posthumanism, and astrobiology.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Vicini

M

2-4:20p

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO7291-01

Moral Agency

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

This course explores the topic of moral agency through texts in theological ethics treating autonomy, human rights, conscience, and sin. It also incorporates interdisciplinary literature that considers ways in which agency is impacted by social practices, structures, and cultural norms. Case studies will be incorporated to consider how concrete social questions may impact standard understandings of autonomy and agency and the influence of nonrational factors on human freedom.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Heyer

T

2-4:20p

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston University School of Theology

STHTS 805

Spirit and Art of Conflict Transformation

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

This course is a response to the experience of destructive conflict in the church and in the world, as well as the experience of religion as a source of conflict. More importantly, it is a response to the call to every Christian to be ministers of reconciliation and peacebuilders. The course will introduce students to the theology, theory and practice of faith-based conflict transformation, preparing students to become religious leaders equipped with fundamental tools and skills for engaging conflict and transforming conflict in a way that advances God's goal of shalom, a culture of justpeace.

Professor

Class Day & Time

James McCarty

R

6:30-9:15pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston University School of Theology

STHTS 845

Christian Social Ethics

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

Comparative study of historical and contemporary Christian approaches to the nature, sources, methods, and concepts of ethics in diverse contexts. The course is in two parts: an historical overview of the development of Christian social ethics from biblical times to the twenty-first century; an in-depth exploration of approaches to specific contemporary social issues including war and peace, ecology, economic justice, and equality.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Nimi Wariboko

M

2:30-5:15pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2196

After Luther: Faith, Will, Law, and the Question of Goodness

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

Is it possible for a person to know and do �the good�? Can we trust in the law, the will, or faith to make us good? These questions were central to Luther�s reforms. Kant, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche, who spent their formative years in a Lutheran context, would also engage these questions in explicit, implicit, and deeply critical ways. Later, theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer drew from all of these authors in order to rethink his own ethics of political resistance to fascism. This course will trace these questions across these five authors in critical conversation with contemporary ethical theorists.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Sanchez

W

01:00pm-04:00pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

Recommended Prep: Prior familiarity with philosophy, theory, or theology.

School

Saint John's Seminary

MT502

Catholic Social Doctrine

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

This course provides a comprehensive overview of Catholic Social Doctrine. Relying on the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church and the social encyclicals of the papal Magisterium, the course will treat Catholic belief regarding the proper ordering of economic and political life, Church-state relations, the protection of human life and promotion of the family, immigration, healthcare, care for our common home, and safeguarding peace. In light of contemporary discussions, instruction will prepare students to advance the social doctrine of the Church in the present context.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Fr. Nakkeeran

MW

9:00-10:15 am

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Saint John's Seminary

MT609

War and Murder (M*)

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

Is it ever licit to kill any living thing? If so, in what cases and why? Are there cases where killing is always wrong? In this course we will examine the philosophy of killing. We will focus on five main topics: 1) the ethics of killing animals, 2) capital punishment, 3) suicide/assisted suicide, 4) abortion, and 5) just war theory. Arguments for and against each practice will be examined from a philosophical and also a theological perspective.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Dr. Skalko

T

2:45-4:45 pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary-Hamilton

ET501

Christian Ethics

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

An exploration of how Christians can make and enact good, wise, and faithful ethical choices and develop moral character and community in the midst of a complex world. The course will examine: (1) the foundations of Christian Ethics, especially in Holy Scripture; (2) the contexts of contemporary ethical issues; (3) the methods of moral discernment and decision-making; and (4) the relationship of Christian ethics to that of the surrounding culture and society. Lectures, case studies, and discussion will be employed in an attempt to gain wisdom, understanding, character, and a prophetic voice relative to the moral issues in church and society.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Ridenour, Autumn

M

1:30-4:30pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Online?

Synchronous

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Hartford International

WS-600

Eco-Spirituality

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

Eco-Spirituality: This course invites students into experiential immersion in the sacred wild as a central dimension of human spiritual and/or religious life. Focusing on themes of beauty, biophilia (and biophobia), and love, the course encompasses eco-philosophy, science, and a range of religious and non-religious spiritual voices relating to love of Earth and one’s local place, along with weekly outdoor practices inviting students into practices of encounter and deepening relationship with creatures, places, and the divine. At the heart of this course is the relation between human environmental- and generational-justice questions and the destruction of beauty in late capitalism – along with examples and resources for sustaining hope, action, and the renewal of the beauty that sustains all that is.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Dahill

W

5-7pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Saint John's Seminary

MT500

Moral Theology for the Lay Apostalate

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

With St. Thomas Aquinas as our guide, and both the Catechism of the Catholic Church and Pope St. John Paul II’s encyclical on moral theology, Veritas Splendor, as foundational documents, this course invites its students to meditate upon who we are and what it means to be a human person created in love in the image of God. We will ponder, too, who God is and His revelation to us with respect to creation and who we are. Our moral life, our actions, fit, are situated, within the Truth of who God is and who He creates us to be. From the basic understanding of fundamental moral theology we will be prepared to engage with the moral life. Grace, Virtue, Freedom, Revelation, Conscience, and Authority will then be the themes and language and tools we discuss to shape our understanding and interiorization of the Good, and Holy, and Virtuous, and Happy Life. Classes are held at Saint John’s Seminary in Brighton, MA.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Dr. A. Coleman

S

8:30-12:30pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

All in-person classes, alternating Saturdays 8:30am–12:30pm; Dates: Sept. 7, Sept. 21, Oct. 5, Oct. 19, Nov. 2, Nov. 16, Nov. 23, Dec. 14

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMCE7216

Virtue Ethics

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

This course introduces the emerging field of Christian virtue ethics. The course begins with a study of the theological and philosophical theories of virtue that have shaped contemporary Catholic and Protestant accounts of virtue. Attention is given to the relation of virtue theory and the virtues to: the Gospels and the life of Jesus; the Christian community; theological anthropology; human happiness; the natural law; and moral norms. The course also discusses the academic and pastoral uses of virtue ethics through the examination of contemporary cases in light of the virtues.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Daniel J. Daly

R

6:30-9:00

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMCE8002

Fundamental Moral: Theological Ethics

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

This Level Two course treats Roman Catholic fundamental moral theology, focusing on both traditional and contemporary understandings of principal themes such as: The Nature and History, as well as a Methodological Model for Approaching Fundamental Moral Theology; The Moral Person and Moral Community; Conscience, Moral Norms and the Natural Law; Evaluations of Moral Acts; Sin (personal and social), Conversion and Reconciliation; Roles of Church Teaching (Magisterium) & Tradition in selected contemporary issues in the areas of sexual ethics, health care and bioethics, Catholics in the political arena will be discussed in terms of applying the fundamental themes of moral theology.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Christina McRorie

M

2:00-4:50

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

At least one course in Christian Ethics

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMCE8152

Catholic Social Teaching in Pope Francis� Era

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

From Pope Leo XIII�s Rerum novarum (1891) on, the social magisterium of the popes offers continuity in its proclaiming of the Gospel through addressing social, political and economic issues and newness because of changing contexts and specific accents of each pope. What continuity and newness can we find in Pope�s Francis social teaching? In this seminar, we will read and discuss major contributions of the Argentinian pope on ecology, migrations, poverty, and social friendship. Putting them in perspective with those of his predecessors, considering their theological weight, and assessing their relevance for today�s challenges, we will attempt to figure out the new impetus he gives to the long tradition of the Church�s social teaching.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Gr�goire Catta, SJ

W

10:00-12:50

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

one graduate level moral theology course

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO5013-01

Communities of Knowledge: Explorations in Theology and Philosophy of Science

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

This course is brings the disciplines of Theology and Philosophy of Science into constructive dialogue. The course will explore key themes that lie at the intersection of both of these disciplines such as the following: the function of communities and social contexts in shaping the construction of knowledge, the role of experience in knowledge production, the nature of evidence, definitions of laws of nature, the nature and function of explanation, the possibility of assessing theories, the use of models, and the entanglements of theology and science with values and ethics.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Ulishney

T

3-5:25p

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

UNDERGRAD/GRAD SPLIT

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO5533-01

Antisemitism, Racism, and Christian Nationalism

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

Events over the past decade have illustrated how antisemitism, racism, and Christian nationalism are intertwined ideologies. This course will offer a historical and thematic investigation into how these three ideologies emerge within Christian contexts, the ways in which Christian theologies and institutions inform them, and modes of resistance to them. A core outcome of this class will be to recover and generate theological positions that actively counter these ideologies.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Joslyn-Siemiatkoski

T

3-5:25p

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

UNDERGRAD/GRAD SPLIT

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO5574-02

Ethics, Religion, and International Politics

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

An examination of the role of religion in international politics and of ethical approaches to international affairs. Special emphasis will be given to religion as a source of conflict, religious communities as transnational agents for justice, protection of human rights, and peace; the historical development and contemporary formulations of ethical norms for the use of force; and ethical and religious contributions to reconciliation and solidarity.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Owens

MW

3-4:15p

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

GRAD/UGRAD SPLIT, REQUIRED DISCUSSION: THEO5574-03 (T, 1-2p), -04 (R, 2-3p), -05 (R, 3-4p), -06 (R, 4-5p)

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO7055-01

Global Politics, Political Theology, and Ethics

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

This course addresses important ethical issues that arise in international politics including issues of equality, poverty, and conflict. Specific attention will be given to the work of theology both the secularized theologies of international politics and the more explicit theologies of religious actors in international politics. In considering the theologies at work and the ethical issues that arise, sustained attention will be given to the global history of colonialism and the resulting imperial and racialized relations that are constitutive of international politics today.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Wambui

W

1-3:50p

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College Department of Theology

THEO8517-01

Theology, Ethics, and Politics

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

How can Christian ethics respond to the intractability of historical evil and the difficulty of structural change? This course will work on the borderlines of political theology, public theology, liberation theology, Christian social ethics, and Catholic social teaching, reading for example, Bohoeffer, Moltmann, Solle, Day, Niebuhr, Murray, Hauerwas, Sobrino, Katongole, and additional examples of global Christian ethics and politics.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Cahill

T

4:30-6:50p

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

Y

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

DOCTORAL

School

Boston University School of Theology

STHTS 824

Watershed Discipleship

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

As a section of Practicing Faith, Watershed Discipleship explores place-based spiritual and theological practices in order both to connect students to the Boston watershed and to equip them with the skills needed to get to know and live responsibly in other watersheds they might inhabit in the future.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Becky Copeland

M

2:30-5:15pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston University School of Theology

STHTS 848

Global Pentecostalism and Christian Renewal

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

The last 50 years have seen the explosion of Pentecostal-Charismatic type churches in the world, becoming not only the fastest growing segment of Christianity, but also the vanguard of the global Christian movement. This is a basic course on the theology, ethics, and history of the worldwide Pentecostal-Charismatic renewal movements. It offers a historical-descriptive approach of the movements in various countries, theological analyses of their doctrines and beliefs, a sociological investigation of their religious techniques, and an ethical study of their social actions and political spiritualities. Students will learn how Pentecostal-Charismatic movements are transforming themselves to be a major positive force for social justice in this- worldly realm. Drawing on readings from religious studies, theology, politics, sociology, and anthropology, this course seeks to transcend disciplinary boundaries to enable students to better understand Pentecostal and Charismatic movements, their recent histories, and their potentials for renewal of Christianity across denominational lines and across the Catholic- Protestant divide.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Nimi Wariboko

W

2:30-5:15pm

Grading Option

Letter

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 3166

Ecotheology

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

This course will survey constructive religious reflection that is informed by an ecological worldview and accountable to various forms of environmental activism. Readings will be drawn from a variety of religious and spiritual traditions, among them Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Paganism, religious naturalism, and Indigenous spirituality. We will pay special attention to the interplay between ecotheology and various theologies of liberation. Students will be invited to develop their own constructive theological or atheological proposals in dialogue with the assigned readings. Throughout the semester, we will use optional book groups to explore additional ecotheological texts. All students are expected to complete one or more group projects and to provide oral and written feedback on one another’s work. Students will have the option of completing a major research paper. Jointly offered in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 1577.

Professor

Class Day & Time

McKanan

T

12:00pm-02:30pm

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

4

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Saint John's Seminary

MT505

Bioethics in the Catholic Tradition

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

FA24

The field of science and technology is an ever-evolving and rapidly developing field that has given rise to countless new possibilities, particularly in the area of healthcare. Although such an enterprise seems enticing, these new developments, especially within the last century, have raised a number of moral questions. Just because something is technically possible does not necessarily mean that it should be done. This course will cover the fundamental principles of Catholic bioethics to see how the Church has consistently responded to bioethical questions from the perspective of both faith and reason. Students will utilize these principles to develop sound moral reasoning to respond to bioethical questions and issues with truth and charity.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Fr. Nakkeeran

TR

10:30-11:45 am

Grading Option

Letter, P/F, Audit

Credits

3

Online?

N

Professor Approval Req'd?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

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