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Boston College
School of Theology & Ministry

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMNT8083

Letter to the Hebrews

BTI Category

Semester

Scripture & Biblical Studies

SP24

This course will examine the major interpretive issues surrounding this Letter to the Hebrews. Attention will be given to matters of literary form, historical context, and theological imagery.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Angela Kim Harkins

F

9:00-12:00 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

PreReq: One graduate level course in OT or NT

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMST8571

Theological Aesthetics

BTI Category

Semester

Systematic Theology & Philosophy (Western)

SP24

This course is a study of the mystery of God from the perspective of aesthetics and art. In other words, we will try to understand God's saving presence and action in our lives, in the world, and in history, based on the transcendental and liberating experience of art, and we will try to speak about God, who has revealed God's self in Christ, using aesthetic categories. We will also explore different ways to establish a conversational relationship between theology and the arts.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Vicente Chong, S.J.

R

9:30-11:30 AM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

Y

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

At least two courses in Systematic Theology

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMTM2004

Intermediate Greek II

BTI Category

Semester

Languages

SP24

The purpose of the course is to teach fluent reading while reviewing grammar, syntax and vocabulary as needed. It presupposes that the student has taken one full-year course of Greek and that the student has a working knowledge of the elements of Greek morphology and syntax. In accomplishing the course's purpose, the student is introduced to a variety of NT and LXX texts as well as other texts by Greek authors.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Maria Kakavas

MW

1:00-2:30 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

P/F

3

Y

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

TMNT2001 (Intermediate Greek I) or its equivalent

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMCE7034

Critical Ethical Issues

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

SP24

This course considers critical contemporary issues from Catholic, interdenominational, interfaith, international, and cross-cultural perspectives. Attention will be given to the Wesleyan Quadrilateral (scripture, tradition, reason, and experience) and casuistry to ground a common approach in the examination and interrogation of the issues to be addressed. The principal ethical issues to be studied include: economic justice (access to health and human services), sexual ethics (just love, sexual identity, misogyny, pedophilia, and reproduction), respect life (abortion, euthanasia, hyper-incarceration and capital punishment), fanaticism and religious fundamentalism, environmental degradation and human ecology (natural disasters), and the toll of a perpetual state of war.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Mary Jo Iozzio

T

12:30-3:20 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMCE8117

Christian Ethics and Social Structures

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

SP24

This course examines the various ways in which Christian ethicists have addressed social structures, from the groundbreaking work of Latin American liberation theologians in the 1960s to today. The course emphasizes the necessity of understanding social realities (such as structure, culture, and the relation of structure and moral agency) in order produce normative claims regarding social evil and how persons should respond such evil. To that end, the course introduces students to prominent social theories, such as methodological individualism and critical realism. The course then turns to critical contemporary ethical problems, such as global warming and the exploitation of labor.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Daniel J. Daly

W

4:00-6:20 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

One course in Christian Ethics

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMCE8145

Theological Ethics and the Economy

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

SP24

This course brings theological ethics to bear upon key dynamics of contemporary global markets. Taking cues from the See, Judge, Act methodology, it begins with an attempt to understand how markets and economies work through a critical conversation with economics. This will include attending to the production of economic knowledge - who gets to describe economic realities? It then uses resources from CST and liberation theology to ask about the place of theological judgments in markets - how do the commitments of the Christian tradition tutor us to view the goals and stakes of economic activity? Finally, how does this tradition invite us to engage economic life, individually and collectively? This is as much a question about discipleship and spirituality as it is about public policy, and will lead to reflection on how communities of faith can and do partner with God amidst the complexities of our globalized world.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Christina MCRorie

W

1:00-3:30 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

One prior course in Christian Ethics or Moral Theology

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC7027

History of Western Christianity II, 850-1650

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

General survey of Western Christianity, with special emphasis on institutional, theological, pastoral and spiritual issues. Lays the foundation for understanding many features of the Church today. Topics include monasticism, establishment of the modern papacy, lay apostolic movements (e.g. beguines), religious orders (e.g., Franciscans, Jesuits), heresies, crusades, inquisitions, scholasticism, saints (e.g., Hildegard of Bingen, Francis of Assisi, Ignatius of Loyola), popular devotions, women in church, mysticism, Protestant Reformation, church councils (e.g., Trent), overseas evangelization. Lectures, readings in primary sources, focused discussion.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Catherine M. Mooney

T

12:30-2:50 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC7230

Medieval Theology

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

The course provides an historical introduction to Christian theology in the medieval West, c. 400 - c. 1400, with a focus on medieval scholasticism. Fundamental themes include modes of theological discourse, scriptural exegesis, monasticism, mysticism, and scholasticism. The course considers how such theologians as Augustine of Hippo, Pseudo-Dionysius, Bede, Anselm of Canterbury, Bernard of Clairvaux, Hugh and Richard of St. Victor, Robert of Melun, Peter Lombard, Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Bonaventure, Mechthild of Magdeburg, Gertrude of Helfta, and John Duns Scotus understood such central theological topics as the natural knowledge of God, divine revelation, Trinity, creation, the human person, sin, evil, grace, predestination, Christ, mystical union, the Virgin Mary, salvation, and the sacraments.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Franklin T. Harkins

F

9:00 AM -12:00 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC7303

Screening Saints & Sanctity

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This course explores saints as they are depicted in award-winning films, primary sources by or about the saints, and scholarly sources regarding the saints and their subsequent portrayals by film directors. These latter figures - modern hagiographers - contribute toward constructing a given saint's image as the saint is popularly understood. Exploring the historical contexts of both the saint in question and his or her later interpreter will illuminate the pressing theological, religious, ecclesial, social, and political concerns in their respective eras. The course aims to elevate teaching and preaching regarding these multi-layered perspectives on saints and notions of sanctity.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Catherine M. Mooney

R

3:30-5:30 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC8144

The Spiritual Theology of Ignatius of Loyola

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), primary founder of the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits), produced the largest collection of writings of any sixteenth-century figure, excepting only Philip Melanchton (1497-1560). In this seminar course, students will examine the entire Ignatius corpus with regard to salient themes to assess their development over the course of Ignatius' life and how they should be reinterpreted (or not) for twenty-first century Christians. This course is recommended for those intending advanced studies in Jesuit history and spirituality.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Barton T. Geger

T

1:00-3:30 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

At least one year of graduate theology OR a previous class on Ignatian spirituality/Jesuit history.

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMNT7023

Introduction to New Testament

BTI Category

Semester

Scripture & Biblical Studies

SP24

The New Testament is a collection of diverse writings that are central to Christian faith and life. This course will introduce students to the literary characteristics, historical context, and theological content of these writings and to the methods and approaches associated with the modern discipline of biblical studies.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Matthew Monnig, S.J.

ASYNCHRONOUS

ASYNCHRONOUS

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

Y

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMNT7271

The Parables of Jesus

BTI Category

Semester

Scripture & Biblical Studies

SP24

Though it is widely recognized that the parables play an important role in the NT and in the study of Jesus, nearly every aspect of the study of parables beyond this most basic of statements has been the subject of vigorous debate. Everything from the definition of a parable to the number of parables in the NT to the proper interpretation of parables to how parables relate to the study of the historical Jesus - all of these issues and more have been contested and disagreed upon by NT scholars. Thus, this course seeks to provide students with insight into the history of scholarship on parables and to provide students with the knowledge and tools both to understand the parables better and to interpret them.

Professor

Class Day & Time

David Jorgensen

T

4:00-6:00 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

Some exposure to the academic study of the New Testament, especially the Gospels, is helpful but not required.

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMNT8140

Seminar in Current Biblical Scholarship

BTI Category

Semester

Scripture & Biblical Studies

SP24

Intensive critical examination of recent scholarly works (4-5 books) by diverse authors in biblical studies (both OT and NT) with a particular focus on the methodology. Through careful reading of these works, students will learn about groundbreaking work in the field and understand how successful arguments are constructed.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Jaime L. Waters

T

10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

Y

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

The course is required for first-year STL students concentrating in biblical studies, and is open without prerequisites to doctoral students concentrating in biblical studies. With permission of the instructor, the course is open to, and appropriate for, other advanced graduate students with significant work in biblical studies and contemplating additional advanced study in the discipline (e.g., ThM students, second-year MTS students).

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMOT8120

Wisdom Literature

BTI Category

Semester

Scripture & Biblical Studies

SP24

Wisdom literature comprises the Old Testament books of Proverbs, Job, Qoheleth (Ecclesiastes), Sirach, and the Book of Wisdom. We will read the above-named books (plus Song of Songs) and trace the further development of wisdom in the Second Temple period, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and New Testament books influenced by wisdom: the Epistle of James, the Gospel of John, and such passages referring to wisdom as Luke 7:35 and 10:21-22; Matt 11:19 and 11:25-30; Eph 3:8-10; and Col 1:15-20.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Andrew R. Davis

R

9:30-11:50 AM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

Graduate or high-level undergraduate introduction to the Old Testament

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMPS7254

English Chants of the Roman Liturgy

BTI Category

Semester

Preaching, Liturgy, & Ritual

SP24

The English chants provided in the Liturgy of the Hours and the Roman Missal 3rd edition make it possible to sing the liturgy. Sung liturgy is an ideal of the liturgical reforms issuing from the Second Vatican Council. This module provides students with: 1)an exploration of sung vernacular liturgy in the liturgical reform of the II Vatican Council, 2) instruction in the dynamics of singing well, 3) practice in the genres of chant in the English missal and the Liturgy of the Hours.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Joseph Weiss, S.J.

F (Feb 2, 9, 16, 23)
(Feb 2, 9, 16 & 23)

1:00-4:00 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

P/F

1

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMPS7279

Conflict Resolution and Transformation

BTI Category

Semester

Practical/Pastoral Theology

SP24

Conflict theory can enable constructive responses to situational disagreements and long-term relationship building. This course combines resources from secular conflict theory and Christian theology and ministry to foster transformation of micro (interpersonal), meso (communal), and macro (societal, international) level conflicts. Most texts reference the U.S. context, but other cultural perspectives are welcome. Assignments include regular short papers and a presentation. This is a discussion-based (not lecture-based) class; close reading is required.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Heather M. DuBois

T

3:30-5:30 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMPS8008

Liturgical Presiding for Ordained Ministry

BTI Category

Semester

Preaching, Liturgy, & Ritual

SP24

A practicum designed to prepare ordination candidates in the Roman Catholic Church for the ministry of liturgical presidency. Students will meet twice a week (once for theory and once for practice) as well as in small groups and for videotaping.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Joseph Weiss, S.J.

R

9:30-11:50 AM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

P/F

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

Intro to Liturgy; Sacraments; Eucharistic Theology

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMPS8088

Calling out from the Depths: Jewish and Christian Interpretations of the Psalms

BTI Category

Semester

Scripture & Biblical Studies

SP24

For centuries, Jews and Christians have turned to the Book of Psalms in times of joy and thanksgiving, and in times of sadness and lament. However, there have been far fewer opportunities for members of these two communities and others to explore these ancient poetic texts together as fellow spiritual seekers. What do we share in common? Where do we differ? How might reading these sources with people with different religious or ideological commitments impact our relationship with the text?

Professor

Class Day & Time

Andrew R. Davis and Or Rose (Hebrew College)

W
(Feb 7, 14, 21, 28, March 13, 20)

4:30-6:30 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

P/F

1

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

At least one course in Biblical Studies and one course in Theology; can be at graduate or undergraduate level.

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMPT8022

Seminar in Practical Theology

BTI Category

Semester

Practical/Pastoral Theology

SP24

An exploration of Practical Theology, its history, methodological commitments, and intent. Practical theology is theology at the service of life. It is theology that takes seriously cultural, social, and political contexts, historical times, places and peoples, as it utilizes the resources of Scripture, tradition and experience. In this course, we will examine Practical Theology's claims for the theory/praxis nexus, interculturality, interdisciplinarity, the noetic content in religious practices, and the significance of bodiliness and context.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Hosffman Ospino

W

4:00-6:20 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

Y

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

One year of theology at a graduate level

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMPT8137

Public Theology, Politics, and Faith in the United States

BTI Category

Semester

Practical/Pastoral Theology

SP24

This class is an introduction to the history of the academic field and practice of public theology as it emerged at the intersections of liberation and political theology with Christian social ethics, especially in the context of the United States. In our time together we will consider several models and definitions of public theology, reflect on ways to engage faith in public, and examine the role and responsibility of faith leaders and scholars to communicate with a public beyond a congregation. The course will explore some basic legal and political concepts to frame the semester, however it will primarily be focused on theological and philosophical themes. We will explore the United States as a religiously and culturally pluralistic context, considering the challenges and opportunities that emerge as a result of this. Particular attention will be given to engagement with the concept of Christian Nationalism and the ways in which Christianity has sometimes been used as a frame in an attempt to legitimate violence or oppression.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Callid Keefe-Perry

F

1:00-4:00 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

Fundamental Theology, Theological Foundations in Practical Perspective, or equivalent.

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMST7020

The Church

BTI Category

Semester

Systematic Theology & Philosophy (Western)

SP24

The ecclesial dimension of Christian faith is the focal point of this course. The course will locate the church within both a Trinitarian theology and a theological anthropology. Specific topics for exploration include the place of the church in the Creed, the sacramentality of the church, a theology of mission, and of structure and authority. The course will also explore current issues shaping the church's life and its place in the wider culture.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Margaret Eletta Guider, O.S.F.

T

6:30-9:00 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMST7045

Grace

BTI Category

Semester

Systematic Theology & Philosophy (Western)

SP24

A historical and textual examination of how some Christian thinkers have described and conceptualized the experience of grace. After considering the biblical sources, the class examines, through lecture and discussion, patristic, medieval, reformation, and modern approaches. Themes to be explored include: sin, forgiveness, and healing; divine initiative and human freedom; sanctification; the relationship between nature and grace; and, social dimensions of grace. Authors include: Augustine, Pelagius, Aquinas, Luther, Trent, John of the Cross, Rahner, Lonergan, and liberation theologians.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Dominic F. Doyle

R

10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMST7215

Philosophy for Theological Study

BTI Category

Semester

Systematic Theology & Philosophy (Western)

SP24

This course has two aims: (1) critical study of philosophical texts that have been important in the development of Christian theological reflection; (2) investigate relations between philosophy and theology from the Classical epoch into the late 20th century. This course is designed especially for students of Theology, Ministry, and the joint MA program in philosophy and theology, but is open to all students.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Dominic Doyle

W

10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMST8017

Ecclesial Ministry

BTI Category

Semester

Systematic Theology & Philosophy (Western)

SP24

This course explores the theology, history, and spirituality of ministry in the church. The emphasis will be on the ecclesial foundations for ministry and the relationship between ministry and the mission of all the baptized. The course will examine current issues in the theology and practice of ministry as well as the implications of ministry for the faith and practice of the minister.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Margaret Eletta Guider, O.S.F.

M

12:30-2:50 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

The Church

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMST8065

Ellacuria, Sobrino, Romero

BTI Category

Semester

Systematic Theology & Philosophy (Western)

SP24

Oscar Romero, Ignacio Ellacuría, and Jon Sobrino represent three leading figures in Latin American liberation theology. This seminar explores their converging theological projects, which outline a major trajectory in Catholic Theology since the Second Vatican Council. After exploring the historical and cultural context that shaped the work of these three men, we will engage on a close reading and critical evaluation of their work. Because they influence one another, we will particularly attend to those theological themes in which crosspollination has taken place: Christology, ecclesiology, soteriology and spirituality.

Professor

Class Day & Time

O. Ernesto Valiente

W

6:30-9:00 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

Y

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

Fundamental Theology

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMST8112

Seminar: Contemporary Liturgical Sacramental Theology

BTI Category

Semester

Systematic Theology & Philosophy (Western)

SP24

This seminar will deal with postmodern approaches to sacramental theology, especially the major work of Louis-Marie Chauvet and Sacrament, as well as the work of Jean-Luc Marion, David Power, and others.

Professor

Class Day & Time

John F. Baldovin, S.J.

T

12:30-3:20 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

Y

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

A course in either Liturgy or Sacraments

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMST8146

Theology and Science: Selected Questions

BTI Category

Semester

Systematic Theology & Philosophy (Western)

SP24

The course examines selected questions in theology's dialogue with the natural sciences. Is it possible to embrace both science and Christian faith? Does science undermine human responsibility and freedom? How do scientific understandings of time relate to the question of God's eternity? In what ways does God act in the world of nature and how does this relate to the history of salvation? These and other questions are selected to demonstrate how the dialogue between science and theology both informs and challenges contemporary theological thinking. The main dialogue partners in this course are modern physics, cognitive sciences, and evolutionary science.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Ligita Ryliskyte, SJE

T

3:30-6:20 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

undergraduate studies in theology or related field or a year of graduate studies in theology

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMST8544

Seminar: Teresa of Avila

BTI Category

Semester

Systematic Theology & Philosophy (Western)

SP24

Canonized in 1622, declared a Doctor of the Church in 1970, St. Teresa of Avila (1515-1582) is a woman whose importance for the Church is paramount. Her works reveal an ingenuous and forceful personality, as well as a most fascinating experience of God. In this seminar at the crossroads of theology, spirituality and history, we will read large parts of Teresa's works (e.g., the Autobiography, and the Interior Castle). Alongside a linear reading of those texts, some themes would be explored which criss-cross this corpus. (Note: some knowledge of Spanish would be helpful, but not required).

Professor

Class Day & Time

André Brouillette, S.J.

M

12:30-2:50 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

Y

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

Graduate courses in Theology, Spirituality, or Church History.

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMST8567

Christology in the Making: An Inquiry into Christology from Below

BTI Category

Semester

Systematic Theology & Philosophy (Western)

SP24

This course explores an approach to Christology that has emerged in the last few decades and has come to be known as a "Christology from below" -- that is, a Christology that inquires into and builds from the historical circumstances and events of Jesus' life and ministry. The course begins with study of the historical Jesus, offering a look at the emerging picture of Jesus arising from present-day historiography, archaeology, and literary analysis. It then proceeds to focus on the works of several contemporary theologians who make a case for and/or exemplify a Christology done from below.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Benjamin Valentin

T

4:00-6:20 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

Y

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

At least one year of graduate level theological studies and one previous course in Christology

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMTM2003

New Testament Greek II

BTI Category

Semester

Languages

SP24

The main objective of the course is to be able to read the New Testament in the original. This is the second part of the two semester course where we will finish all Croy's lessons, provided that a good understanding and working knowledge of the material has been attained. We will cover a chapter every two class meetings and the third meeting we will have a review, a quiz and may introduce a new chapter depending on the progress. The students will be expected to master the basic grammar and most common vocabulary of the New Testament Greek, complete all assignments on time and participate actively in class.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Maria Kakavas

MW

3:30-4:45 PM (Mon); 4:00-5:15 PM (Wed)

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

P/F

3

Y

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

TMNT2002 New Testament Greek I (or its equivalent)

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMTM7175

The Church and Interreligious Dialogue

BTI Category

Semester

Interreligious Learning

SP24

Dialogue between religions has become one of the urgent yet intractable challenges of our time. In this course, we will focus on the engagement of the Catholic Church and Catholic theologians in interreligious dialogue. The first part of the course will deal with topical issues, such as the history of, and the theological foundations for dialogue, intermonastic dialogue, scriptural reasoning, etc. The second part will focus on the particular dialogues between Christianity and Islam, Christianity and Judaism, Christianity and Hinduism, and Christianity and Buddhism

Professor

Class Day & Time

Catherine Cornille

M

3:00-4:50 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMCE7304

Moral Theology and Spirituality

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

SP24

Although ethics and spirituality were considered distinct - and perhaps even estrange - for some time, developments in Catholic moral theology since the mid-twentieth century have led to a renewed awareness of the interdependence of these two kinds of theology. This course introduces students to the historical divergence and current state of the conversation between these disciplines, and to some of the challenges confronting and prospects for developing a moral theological imagination that is organically nourished by spirituality, and a spirituality that is in turn grounded in and structured by morality. Themes addressed include the place of discipleship, discernment, sainthood, and the experience of God in Christian ethics, the spirituality of liberation theology, and the role of conscience, virtue, and community in Christian spiritual life.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Christina MCRorie

M

1:00-3:00 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMCE8118

Healthcare Ethics

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

SP24

This course explores contemporary Catholic health care ethics. The course begins by examining the sources, methods, and influential documents of the Catholic medical ethical tradition. The syllabus traces the development of the tradition from the 16th to the 21st century. Prominent secular approaches in the field are studied as well. The course then takes up: 1) clinical, case-based medical ethics; and, 2) ethics at the institutional level. Applied topics include: abortion; access to health care and the distribution of medical resources; end of life ethics; mergers among Catholic and non-Catholic health institutions; and international recruiting of health care workers.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Daniel J. Daly

F

1:00-4:00 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

One course in Christian Ethics, biotethics or medical ethics

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMCE8541

Disability Studies and Theological Ethics

BTI Category

Semester

Ethics (all traditions)

SP24

This course investigates Disability Studies at the intersections of interdisciplinary subjects in the humanities, including Scripture, theology, and theological ethics. Attention will be given to the hermeneutic work of Disability Studies and considerations in scripture studies, theology, and theological ethics. The course a) presents the history of People with Disabilities (similar to feminist retrievals of "undocumented stories" found by reading between the lines of texts), b) explores the move from institutionalization to rights, liberties, and self-determination, and c) considers how theological ethics in particular calls for something radically new in the way of solidarity between PWD and their normate counterparts.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Mary Jo Iozzio

W

10:00-12:30 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

Y

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

One graduate level course in fundamental moral theology (including CST) and one graduate level course in systematic theology, liberation theology or equivalen

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC7179

History of Western Christianity III: Catholicism from the French Revolution to Vatican II

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

What John O'Malley, S.J. calls the Church's "long nineteenth century," from the French revolution to the 1950's, although often considered a period of secularization, was also a great age of renewal for the Roman Catholic Church. It witnessed a tremendous institutional growth of the Church, the assertion of doctrinal and administrative control from Rome known as ultramontanism, the flowering of spirituality and devotional life, and the spread of the faith from Europe throughout the world by means of extensive missionary activity. This course will consider the institutional and intellectual transformation of the Church in the nineteenth century, but will also pay close attention to changes in popular piety and the social role of the Church. Focus will be both topical and regional.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Jeffrey von Arx, S.J.

MW

8:30-9:50 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC7301

Tolkien: Catholicism, History, and Myth

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This course will examine the literary works of J.R.R. Tolkien (author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, among others) in primarily a historical framework, but also with attention to Tolkien's Catholic worldview. Tolkien was a scholar of medieval literature as well as a fantasy author. He intended his fictional Middle Earth to represent not only a new national myth-cycle for the English people, but also a particularly Catholic worldview, potentially counter to the landscape of industrialization and World War I. This course will examine these themes and present a narrative concerned with the middle ages, medievalisms, and early 20th-century Catholicism as refracted through Tolkien's lenses. It will also consider discussions of race in Tolkien's thought, linguistics, and various adaptations of his work as well as his relationship with C.S. Lewis and the other members of the Inklings (his writers' group).

Professor

Class Day & Time

Stephen Molvarec, S.J.

W

1:30-3:50 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC8143

Aquinas's Summa contra Gentiles

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This course aims to introduce students to Thomas Aquinas's first and only complete summa, the Summa contra Gentiles (ScG; 1259-65). In spite of its considerable depth and its more extensive treatment of certain central theological and philosophical themes (e.g., God, proofs of divine existence, providence) as compared to the Summa theologiae (ST), the ScG is read and studied far less frequently than his mature ST. Unlike the ST, the ScG is written in an accessible discursive-prose format, it is a complete summa, and its comparative brevity means that it can be read and carefully studied over the course of one semester.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Franklin T. Harkins

W

10 AM-12:50 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

One graduate level HC (History of Christianity) course

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMHC8148

Stones, Bones, Spaces and Places: A History of Christianity's Relationship with the Material World

BTI Category

Semester

Church History/History of Religions

SP24

This course will explore the relationship of Christians with the material world and with materiality particularly during Antiquity and the Middle Ages, but with some contemporary discussion as well. Christians, on the one hand, have embraced materiality on account of the incarnation and resurrection of Jesus. On the other hand, some Christians have preferred to find a tension between the material and the spiritual. This course will explore those perspectives as well as the material culture of Christianity in its places, objects, relics, and thought. Students will encounter historical methodologies including the reconstruction of landscape and soundscape as well as theories of material culture.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Stephen Molvarec, S.J.

T

3:30-5:30 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

At least one previous graduate level course in Church History or History

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMNT7047

John: Gospel and Letters

BTI Category

Semester

Scripture & Biblical Studies

SP24

This course will examine the Gospel of John with attention to its distinctive literary and theological aspects within its historical context. Topics that will be given special consideration include the relationship between the Johannine communities and the Jewish groups of their time, the understanding of discipleship in the Fourth Gospel, and the reception of this Gospel in the history of the Church.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Angela Kim Harkins

MW

8:30-9:50 AM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMNT8131

The Old Testament in the New Testament

BTI Category

Semester

Scripture & Biblical Studies

SP24

This course will examine that various ways that New Testament authors make use of Old Testament texts through direct citation, allusion, echo, and other literary techniques. After examining theoretical and methodological issues related to intertextuality, the course will look at the use of the Old Testament in the gospels, Paul, and other New Testament writings by examining specific biblical texts and commentaries on them, to see how understanding the New Testament authors' use of Old Testament texts leads to a better understanding of their writing and theology.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Matthew Monnig, S.J.

T

12:30-3:20 PM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

Y

Notes

One course in Old Testament and One course in New Testament

School

Boston College School of Theology & Ministry

TMOT7067

Introduction to Old Testament

BTI Category

Semester

Scripture & Biblical Studies

SP24

A literary, historical, and theological introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) - the Pentateuch, Historical Books, Wisdom Literature and Psalms, and Prophets.

Professor

Class Day & Time

Andrew R. Davis

MW

10:00-11:50 AM

Credits

Professor Approval Req'd?

Grading Option

Letter

3

N

Online?

N

Prerequisites?

N

Notes

N

School